Other News & Events

NC State offers first bachelors degree

MANSFIELD, OHIO – North Central State College has received approval to confer a Bachelor of Applied Science degree in Mechanical Engineering Technology. NC State becomes one of only four community colleges in Ohio to receive approval to develop and confer a bachelor’s degree.

The opportunity for community colleges to apply to the Chancellor of the Ohio Department of Higher Education (ODHE) to provide a bachelor’s degree, was established by a directive of the ODHE in November 2017. That directive required that the proposals meet numerous guidelines, summarized as answering an established need for employees with in-demand skills to meet the workforce requirements of area businesses. Local employment data was required showing the availability and sustainability of jobs created. The program also needed to be unique to the area served by the community college.

John Carey, chancellor of the Ohio Department of Higher Education, stated in his letter of July 23, 2018, approving the proposal from NC State, “ODHE observed strong evidence of workforce need, clear testimony that NCSC responded to requests of local employers in curriculum development, and evidence that the students’ needs are best met with program delivery at the NCSC location.”

Dr. Dorey Diab, president of North Central State College, is already looking ahead: “We are very pleased to receive approval of this program and the meaningful training it will provide students who will join the workforce serving our community partners. At its core, this program helps bridge part of the skills gap we have been discussing for years. The Chancellor cited the strong support of businesses throughout the region in their approval of our proposal. I’m proud of our team, and I hope we can replicate the responsiveness and vision of this program to meet the needs of other employers throughout the area.”

The Bachelor of Applied Science in Mechanical Engineering Technology will provide opportunity for students of all ages – from current high school students taking College Credit Plus courses to currently employed workers who want to expand their knowledge and improve their careers.

Diab reflected on the value of this new degree as part of a pathway for area students: “By taking advantage of CCP courses, the Tuition Freedom Scholarship, and now the baccalaureate degree, students will be able to receive high quality higher education, at a very affordable rate, with less concern about debt.”

NC State is now working with the Higher Learning Commission, the college’s accrediting body, and ODHE for approval of curriculum and course content as well as the learning outcomes.

Student receives MIMA scholarship

Pristell Dogins can light up a room with a smile. And now with the help of a scholarship, his future is just as bright thanks to the Mansfield Interdenominational Ministerial Alliance (MIMA) and the North Central State College Foundation.

Foundation Executive Director, Chris Copper knew from the moment she met Dogins that he was meant to receive the scholarship. “It was like the stars aligned,” she explains. “He’s a dynamic young man that fit the bill with everything MIMA was looking for in the scholarship recipient. We are very excited and proud to be a part of Dogins’ future and provide him with this scholarship for next semester.”

The MIMA funded an endowed scholarship with the College Foundation almost ten years ago. The group is made up of several pastors from different churches in Mansfield who come together to help the community and its members. The MIMA Scholarship is awarded to a student that is working to improve themselves academically and personally and has a financial need for support to achieve his/her college goals.

When Dogins first heard that he received the scholarship, he was shocked. “It is a very big blessing, and I appreciate everyone that’s involved in making this happen because it means a lot to me. It lets me know that people believe in me,” he said with a smile.

Dogins is studying psychology and has big plans for his future. “I love having in-depth conversations with people to learn why they think and act the way they do.”

He knew from the beginning that North Central State College was where he wanted to continue his educational journey. He explains, “I feel that North Central is a good fit for me because of its intimate environment. The teachers have more one-on-one experience with students.”

“North Central faculty and staff really care about me as a student. I am not just a number to them. They really have gone the extra mile for me, and that’s why I try to go the extra mile for myself, because of those people who believe in me.”

For Laurence Rawls, president of MIMA, giving the scholarship to a local student is all about giving back to the community. “We just wanted to make sure we gave the scholarship to someone who was attending a local college,” he said. “Hopefully they will graduate and want to stay in the community.”

Rawls says MIMA plans to give out scholarships to North Central State College students in the future.

As for Dogins’ future, he would like to continue his education after he graduates from North Central State and eventually obtains his master’s degree.

To find out more about the North Central State College Foundation and scholarships available go to www.ncstatecollege.edu/foundation.

Routine Accreditation Visit

MANSFIELD, OHIO – North Central State College will undergo a comprehensive evaluation visit from the Higher Learning Commission October 8-9, 2018.

The Higher Learning Commission is one of the six regional accrediting agencies in the United States that provide institutional accreditation for institutions of higher education. Institutional accreditation evaluates an entire institution and accredits it as a whole. North Central State College has been accredited by the Higher Learning Commission since 1976.

For the past several years, North Central State College has been in the process of conducting a self-study as a part of accreditation activities. The visit from the Higher Learning Commission is the final step in this process to maintain accreditation.

The public is invited to submit comments regarding North Central State College either online at http://www.hlcommission.org/Student-Resources/third-party-comment.html, or in writing to:

Third-Party Comment on North Central State College

Higher Learning Commission
230 South LaSalle Street, Suite 7-500
Chicago, IL 60604-1411

Comments about North Central State College are due in the Commission offices no later than one month before the October visit. The Commission cannot guarantee that comments received after the due date will be considered. Comments should include the name, address and signature of the person(s) providing the comments. Only signed or otherwise identified comments are considered; comments cannot be anonymous, and are not treated as confidential by the Higher Learning Commission.

About North Central State College

North Central State is a community college that serves 4,400 students on its Mansfield campus, at the Kehoe Center in Shelby, and at the Crawford Success Center in Bucyrus. The College is preparing this area’s workforce by offering more than 70 associate degree and certificate programs of study, including comprehensive technical education in health sciences, general studies, public service, business, engineering technology, and corporate/community services. In addition to technical degrees, North Central State College also offers numerous associate of arts and associate of science degrees, which allow students to transfer credits to other colleges and universities in the pursuit of advanced degrees.

The college offers a wide range of delivery methods including evening and online courses to accommodate students’ schedules. To learn more, visit www.ncstatecollege.edu or call 419-755-4800.

For more information, contact:

Dr. Karen Reed

Vice President for Academic Services

kreed@ncstatecollege.edu
419-755-4538

Cyber Security first graduates

During Commencement 2018, North Central State College will celebrate the graduation of its first six students from the IT-Cyber Security Program.

The graduates are Alexander Parker of Mansfield, Bethany Garber of Ashland, Tristan Gardner of Lexington, Nicole Gibson of Willard, Nicholas McGregor of Butler, and Tyler Westmoreland of Willard.

Mohamed Ghonimy, assistant professor of Cyber Security, began heading the program in 2017. “The classes get the students ready to join the workforce upon graduation,” he explains.

Cyber security student Bethany Garber works on a project in class.“The program has evolved rapidly in the past year with the support of faculty and administration at North Central State College.”

The cyber security program prepares students to detect and defend against network infrastructure attacks. They learn to think like a hacker and how to use the tools hackers use to penetrate network defenses.

Bethany Garber, one of the six graduates, explains why she chose to be a part of the program. “With the way our world is going right now, technology is becoming more and more prominent. As long as technology improves, the need for the cyber security professionals becomes greater.”

“If there is going to be a need for anything in the tech field, it’s going to be security. People are getting smarter and are figuring out how to get your personal information easier.” Garber continues, “I think everyone dealing with any electronic device should at least take a security introduction class.”

All six students graduating from the program will earn an associate of applied science degree in information technology cyber security.

Student building prosthetic arm

Victoria (Tori) Thimmes may only be a teenager but she has big aspirations for her future. Thimmes is building a prosthetic robot arm as part of her project for the College Now program at North Central State College. College-NOW is a two-year program that allows high school juniors to enter college on a track to earn their associate degree as they complete their last two years of high school. She started the College-NOW program as a junior at Buckeye Central High School.

Thimmes knew this was the right program for her. She says, “I came to NC State College and shadowed some of the students, spending the day with them in their classroom.” She continues, “I knew this is what I wanted to do because it’s an associate degree for FREE and you don’t get much better than that.”

Thimmes chose to create a prosthetic arm because of her connection with a coach at Buckeye Central High School, Greg Moore. In 2015, the vehicle Coach Moore was driving was struck by a garbage truck. He lost his left arm.

The idea for the prosthetic arm came to Thimmes when she spotted Moore at the golf course. “I am a golfer and was practicing when I saw Coach Moore trying to hit a ball off a tee. He didn’t have a lot of leverage because he could only use one arm,” she explains.

That gave her the idea to try to build the prosthetic arm as her College-NOW project. She mentioned the project to Moore and he was excited and the possibilities.

Thimmes got started right away. She made most of the essential parts for the prosthetic in the Fab Lab with the 3-D printer.

Thimmes began constructing the arm and testing the materials. “We stretched the materials and compressed it just to see how strong the material is and to make sure it was sturdy enough.” She continues to work on her project and now recruited a team to help. She continues to check in with Coach Moore. She says, “I go back to Buckeye Central somedays just to give him updates on the project. He gets so excited.”

Thimmes will graduate in May with 67 credit hours and her associate degree in integrated engineer technology. She plans to attend either The Ohio State University or the University of Akron majoring in Biomedical Engineering.

For those in high school thinking about attending College-NOW at North Central State College, she gives this advice, “It can be very challenging at first but you really just have to work at it. You have to want it. You have to be motivated enough to keep pushing through and studying. You have to really work at it. You also have to look a few years into the future and say you know that this is going to help me and I should do it no matter how hard it is going to be.”

Sisters begin college journey together

Amanda and Ashley Stockmaster are twin sisters who grew up on a farm in New Washington, Ohio. It was the farm that helped them decide what they wanted to do with their future, which included attending North Central State College.

Amanda is studying to be a mechanical engineer while Ashley wants to study agriculture education eventually. She is currently getting her associate degree in liberal arts.

Growing up the girls had everything from horses to sheep to alpacas on their farm. They learned to take care of the animals and the farm equipment at a young age. The first animals the family began taking care of were horses. Those horses helped the young girls learn to walk. Ashley explains, “The way the horses shift is the same motion as your torso. It helps you gain your balance.”

Amanda adds, “We started with horses because the neurologist and the orthopedic doctors said they would help us learn to walk. When you ride horses, it is the same motion as when you are walking.”

The Stockmaster sisters have cerebral palsy, a developmental disability that affects movement, posture, and coordination. It is caused by brain damage before, during or after birth.

Amanda chose North Central State College for the mechanical engineering program. After graduating from Pioneer Career and Technology Center. She says, “Once I graduated from Pioneer, I wanted to keep going down the same path, so North Central State College was my next step.”

“It is nice that you have small class sizes and instructors that you can understand and can understand you and your circumstances.”

Amanda’s favorite class is engineering materials. She says, “In that class, we pulled metal and plastic bars apart to calculate the force that it took to break the bar. I’m learning a lot from those experiments.”

Ashley also enjoys the smaller class sizes. She explains, “Here you have classes that are small enough where you can get acquainted with your classmates. You can also send them a message through Canvas and ask them to explain the assignment.”

Both Ashley and Amanda will graduate in May 2018. Ashley will obtain her associate degree in Liberal Arts and would like to attend either Wilmington College or The Ohio State University for her bachelor’s degree. “What I am shooting for is to be in a high school setting teaching agriculture.”

Amanda will obtain her associate degree in mechanical engineering. She hopes to enter the workforce following graduation.

Graduate Finds Solace in Photography

For North Central State College graduate Taylor Ruiz, a love of photography first brought him to the Mansfield Campus to major in Visual Communication and Media Technology (VCMT). He explains, “The class that had the most impact on me was the photography class. I had no idea how much I loved photography until then. I would go back to North Central State College just to take a follow-up photography class.”

Ruiz attended NC State from 2012 to 2014. He chose to attend the campus after graduating from Ashland High School because he wanted to go to a college that offered smaller classes sizes. “I knew I wanted to go to college, but I was not ready for a large university. I was lucky to be able to come to North Central State, which was close to home and provided more intimate class sizes.”

During his time on the campus, he was the vice president of the design club and took the majority of his classes at the James W. Kehoe Center in Shelby. As a VCMT student he was able to take advantage of the photography studio. Ruiz says, “I used the photography studio quite often (even if it wasn’t just for a class!)” Students are encouraged to learn and use the facilities as much as possible while studying at North Central State College.

The VCMT program teaches students to use multimedia technology to assemble graphics, text, sound and video into meaningful production. Many VCMT graduates go directly into the workforce. Others, like Ruiz, transfer to other schools to complete their bachelor’s degree.

After graduating, Ruiz transferred his credits he received from his associate degree to Kent State University in Kent, Ohio. He is studying applied communications. He feels that NC State College truly prepared him for his time at Kent. “I feel that VCMT will eventually compliment my communications degree.”

Ruiz also serves with the Army National Guard.

Returning Home to Serve

Mansfield, OH — Austin Chaplin didn’t always know he wanted to be a police officer. But once he put on the uniform and served his community, the same community he grew up in, he knew he made the right choice for his future.

“I wasn’t 100 % sure what major I wanted to pursue when I first started classes at North Central State College. I began as a business major and realized that wasn’t going to work for me.” Austin admits. However, then he met Commander Anne Strouth, Associate Professor/Program Coordinator for Criminal Justice, and everything changed. He explains, “Commander Strouth encouraged and pushed me to follow a path to apply for the police academy. And I never looked back.”

For Chaplin, the discipline and straightforward approach attracted him to the police academy.

“I would have to say my favorite part of the police academy was the defensive tactics class,” he says. The defensive tactics course provides students with the basic principles of unarmed self-defense, including how to defend against physical attack, control aggressive behavior, and how to arrest/subdue an individual using the minimum amount of force.

Soon after graduating from the North Central State College Police Academy, Chaplin passed his civil services test and joined the Galion Police Department. “I am from Galion, so that’s where I wanted to be able to serve as a police officer,” he points out. “Most of the cadets I was in class with were hired by local law enforcement agencies.”

For future cadets thinking about joining the police academy at NC State Chaplin gives some advice. He advises, “Just remember this isn’t a 9 to 5 job. You will be out on the streets, working odd hours, but you will be doing the right thing for your community and keeping your neighbors safe. It’s worth it. It’s time-consuming and hard, but it’s worth it in the end.”

The day and night academies begin each fall semester and conclude at the end of spring semester. The application period for the 2018-2019 academic year will begin April 1, 2018.

For more information about the Police Academy go to https://www.ncstatecollege.edu/cms/certificates/police-academy.

NC State College to offer Bachelors of Applied Science in Mechanical Engineering Technology

MANSFIELD, OHIO – North Central State College has received approval to confer a Bachelor of Applied Science degree in Mechanical Engineering Technology. NC State becomes one of only four community colleges in Ohio to receive approval to develop and confer a bachelor’s degree.

The opportunity for community colleges to apply to the Chancellor of the Ohio Department of Higher Education (ODHE) to provide a bachelor’s degree, was established by a directive of the ODHE in November 2017. That directive required that the proposals meet numerous guidelines, summarized as answering an established need for employees with in-demand skills to meet the workforce requirements of area businesses. Local employment data was required showing the availability and sustainability of jobs created. The program also needed to be unique to the area served by the community college.

John Carey, chancellor of the Ohio Department of Higher Education, stated in his letter of July 23, 2018, approving the proposal from NC State, “ODHE observed strong evidence of workforce need, clear testimony that NCSC responded to requests of local employers in curriculum development, and evidence that the students’ needs are best met with program delivery at the NCSC location.”

Dr. Dorey Diab, president of North Central State College, is already looking ahead: “We are very pleased to receive approval of this program and the meaningful training it will provide students who will join the workforce serving our community partners. At its core, this program helps bridge part of the skills gap we have been discussing for years. The Chancellor cited the strong support of businesses throughout the region in their approval of our proposal. I’m proud of our team, and I hope we can replicate the responsiveness and vision of this program to meet the needs of other employers throughout the area.”

The Bachelor of Applied Science in Mechanical Engineering Technology will provide opportunity for students of all ages – from current high school students taking College Credit Plus courses to currently employed workers who want to expand their knowledge and improve their careers.

Diab reflected on the value of this new degree as part of a pathway for area students: “By taking advantage of CCP courses, the Tuition Freedom Scholarship, and now the baccalaureate degree, students will be able to receive high quality higher education, at a very affordable rate, with less concern about debt.”

NC State is now working with the Higher Learning Commission, the college’s accrediting body, and ODHE for approval of curriculum and course content as well as the learning outcomes.