Other News & Events

Learning happens at all ages

It’s never too late to follow your dreams. At 56 years old, Boris Cooke began a new journey towards his degree at North Central State College.

After several jobs at local businesses, he realized he wasn’t reaching his full potential. “Some of the employees at my previous jobs were making more money than me, however, they were doing the same job. Most of them had their degrees or certifications that I didn’t have,” Cooke explains. “I wanted to go to school and be the first in my family to get a degree.”

In 2013, Cooke went back to school. That’s when he met Chris Barker, Assistant Professor of Industrial Technology. After a long conversation, Cooke enrolled in the Manufacturing Technology Operations Management program.

Barker applauds Cooke for his hard work and determination to improve his life. She says, “Boris has grown a lot and his skills have improved significantly. He is very motivated and has a heart for people. He has also helped motivate the other students to finish their studies. He is very inspiring.”

Within the program, Cooke has utilized the virtual welding machine at the Kehoe Center. The computer-based training system is an educational tool designed to allow students to practice their welding technique in a simulated environment.

“I’ve been working on the virtual welding system a lot,” Cooke says. “You can see everything virtually through the helmet and it helps to guide you through the training. It shows you how to weld safely, then it grades your performance. It has helped me improve my skills so I can be prepared for the workforce.”

“The program is great,” Cooke explains. “There’s nothing you can’t do. You just have to strive and want to do it.”

Cooke has utilized the many programs North Central State College provides to help students succeed. He frequents the tutoring center. “I can’t always study at home,” he says. “I have grandkids running around and many distractions. Also, sometimes my computer isn’t compatible with the programs so I visit the tutoring center for help.”

Cooke is also a member of TRIO, a federally funded grant program through the U.S. Department of Education. It provides and coordinates a variety of educational services for students who are first-generation, low income and/or students with disabilities. Cooke says the TRIO staff was instrumental in his success as a student. He says, “The staff and Barb Keener have both been a huge strength behind my learning. I couldn’t have done this without their support.”

Cooke will graduate in May 2019. “North Central State College has helped me make better decisions for my life,” he says. “It’s good to know that there are people that can help if you want to be helped. There is tremendous support from instructors and they never give up on you.”

Internships lead to rewarding careers

Internships can help put students on the fast track to finding a career they love.  Just ask Tansy Stahle, a visual communication and design student at North Central State College.  She recently had an internships at Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course.  As a VCMT student, she was required to find an internship to complete her degree.

“I loved it.  I was able to get out of the classroom and apply the skills that I learned,” Stahle explains.

She and three other students were chosen as a team of interns at Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course.  During the week they would complete office work and make graphics for social media.  “During the week we would have a list of things we needed to accomplish by a deadline.  We got a lot of real world work experience as interns at the company,” Stahle says. Then the fun would begin on the weekends when the team would take pictures at events and post across the social sites for the business.

Stahle also used her classroom experience.  “Our instructor Lynn Damberger taught us to use Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign.  Those are all applications I used daily at my internship.  I also got to edit videos, which I learned how to do in the classroom as well,” Stahl says.

“My internship has prepared me in a lot of ways.  Now I know what I am capable of doing.  I feel like I have gone from a student to somebody that can do a graphic design job … like a caterpillar to a butterfly,” Stahl explains.

“I think it’s important for students to have an internship.  It has help me bridge the gap between being a student to being out in the workforce.  Now I know what to expect when I am searching for a job.”

After graduation Stahle plans to find a career in marketing or video production.  She says, “I am really just trying to put myself out there and find something new that I enjoy doing.”

PUBLIC NOTICE OF UPCOMING ACCREDITATION REVIEW VISIT BY THE ACEN

North Central State College wishes to announce that it will host a site review for continuing accreditation of its Associate Degree Nursing Program by the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN).

You are invited to meet the site visit team and share your comments about the program in person at a meeting scheduled at 4pm on Wednesday March 6th, 2019 in Room 116 of the Health Science building on the NCSC Main Campus.

Written comments are also welcome and should be submitted directly to:

Dr. Marsal Stoll, Chief Executive Officer

Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing

3343 Peachtree Road NE, Suite 850

Atlanta, GA 30326

 

Or e-mail: mstoll@acenursing.org

 

All written comments should be received by the ACEN by February 27th, 2019. *

Achieving the Dream

On June 5, 2018, Jimmy Rodriquez’s entire life changed in just a few minutes. It was the day the U.S. Immigration and Customs (ICE) raided the business he worked for in Castalia, Ohio.

Rodriguez and his father, Eliseo, were part of the raid that found 114 undocumented workers. He was born in Mexico. He and his family came to the United States when he was two years old. Rodriquez has his Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) permit. However, his father was listed as one of the undocumented workers. That was the moment; Rodriquez became the sole provider for his mother, Beatriz, and his two younger brothers.

“At the moment, my whole life was destroyed. I was heartbroken,” Rodriquez sadly explains.

He had graduated from Willard High School only two days before the raid. He planned to study mechanical engineering at North Central State College. However, the money he had set aside for college was now needed to help take care of his family to survive.

“I had planned on going to NC State. I was working a lot of hours, and with that money, I was going to be able to pay for at least a year, maybe two of college. After this happened, I thought I wasn’t going to be able to further my education,” he says.

When Steve Cummins, vice president of Mansfield Engineering Components, heard Rodriquez’s story he knew he wanted to help. Rodriquez was offered an apprentice-like position at the company. For Jimmy this was the opportunity he needed, “I’m excited to learn from the engineers about design and the mechanical side of it too.”

In addition to the job opportunity, an anonymous benefactor stepped up to pay for Rodriguez’s tuition at North Central State College.

“This means the world to me,” Rodriquez says. “I felt like there was no hope, but I had to keep pushing. Now with this opportunity, I will keep going.”

He will work fulltime at Mansfield Engineering Components while attending classes to get his associate degree in mechanical engineering, eventually earning his bachelor’s degree.

With the help and support of his family and the community, Rodriquez will now be able to achieve his dream.

GPS program leads teen to success

He may only be a freshman in high school, but William Payne is preparing for college. He is part of the Graduate Pathways to Success (GPS) partnership between North Central State College and Mansfield City School District.

This is the first year for the program. It allows students to complete an associate degree while also meeting the requirements for high school graduation.

When William first heard about the program, he immediately told his mother, Veronica Williams Payne, that he wanted to sign up. “After the presentation, William came directly to me and told me I need to sign the paper for the GPS program and go to the meeting,” Veronica explains. As the gifted and talented teacher for the entire district, she recognized the opportunity for her son.

“The GPS program is a game changer. He’s getting information about college readiness much earlier than I did growing up,” Veronica says. “He is preparing for his future before heading out into the world. He’s taking the initiative for his education.”

The GPS program uses the College Credit plus model for dual enrollment in both high school and college courses, so the students graduate from high school and receive an associate degree, without incurring college debt.

“The GPS program means that I will graduate from college two weeks earlier than high school with my associate degree,” William says. “Instead of my first job being a part-time position at a fast-food restaurant, I might be able to already have a professional position.”

“I feel like I will probably brag about that in my adult life.”

It’s a program William says he will never regret getting involved in during high school. “If you think you can do it you absolutely should because it’s an opportunity you don’t want to miss.”

Veronica encourages parents of students in the Mansfield City School district to take the time to look into the program for their children. “If your kid has any interest in the medical profession or college in general you should try the program. They won’t miss out on their high school experiences and won’t have to travel between the buildings,” she explains.

“Parents should definitely go to the information meeting. That opened my eyes to a lot of things and it’s not an additional cost so it’s worth a try.”

In school William participates in cross country, cheerleading, and skiing. He volunteers at the Friendly House in Mansfield and would eventually like to be a camp counselor at Happy Hollow Day Camp.

The GPS program is just the beginning for William. He says, “I plan on doing more and expanding my college education past getting my associate degree.”

NC State offers first bachelors degree

MANSFIELD, OHIO – North Central State College has received approval to confer a Bachelor of Applied Science degree in Mechanical Engineering Technology. NC State becomes one of only four community colleges in Ohio to receive approval to develop and confer a bachelor’s degree.

The opportunity for community colleges to apply to the Chancellor of the Ohio Department of Higher Education (ODHE) to provide a bachelor’s degree, was established by a directive of the ODHE in November 2017. That directive required that the proposals meet numerous guidelines, summarized as answering an established need for employees with in-demand skills to meet the workforce requirements of area businesses. Local employment data was required showing the availability and sustainability of jobs created. The program also needed to be unique to the area served by the community college.

John Carey, chancellor of the Ohio Department of Higher Education, stated in his letter of July 23, 2018, approving the proposal from NC State, “ODHE observed strong evidence of workforce need, clear testimony that NCSC responded to requests of local employers in curriculum development, and evidence that the students’ needs are best met with program delivery at the NCSC location.”

Dr. Dorey Diab, president of North Central State College, is already looking ahead: “We are very pleased to receive approval of this program and the meaningful training it will provide students who will join the workforce serving our community partners. At its core, this program helps bridge part of the skills gap we have been discussing for years. The Chancellor cited the strong support of businesses throughout the region in their approval of our proposal. I’m proud of our team, and I hope we can replicate the responsiveness and vision of this program to meet the needs of other employers throughout the area.”

The Bachelor of Applied Science in Mechanical Engineering Technology will provide opportunity for students of all ages – from current high school students taking College Credit Plus courses to currently employed workers who want to expand their knowledge and improve their careers.

Diab reflected on the value of this new degree as part of a pathway for area students: “By taking advantage of CCP courses, the Tuition Freedom Scholarship, and now the baccalaureate degree, students will be able to receive high quality higher education, at a very affordable rate, with less concern about debt.”

NC State is now working with the Higher Learning Commission, the college’s accrediting body, and ODHE for approval of curriculum and course content as well as the learning outcomes.

Student receives MIMA scholarship

Pristell Dogins can light up a room with a smile. And now with the help of a scholarship, his future is just as bright thanks to the Mansfield Interdenominational Ministerial Alliance (MIMA) and the North Central State College Foundation.

Foundation Executive Director, Chris Copper knew from the moment she met Dogins that he was meant to receive the scholarship. “It was like the stars aligned,” she explains. “He’s a dynamic young man that fit the bill with everything MIMA was looking for in the scholarship recipient. We are very excited and proud to be a part of Dogins’ future and provide him with this scholarship for next semester.”

The MIMA funded an endowed scholarship with the College Foundation almost ten years ago. The group is made up of several pastors from different churches in Mansfield who come together to help the community and its members. The MIMA Scholarship is awarded to a student that is working to improve themselves academically and personally and has a financial need for support to achieve his/her college goals.

When Dogins first heard that he received the scholarship, he was shocked. “It is a very big blessing, and I appreciate everyone that’s involved in making this happen because it means a lot to me. It lets me know that people believe in me,” he said with a smile.

Dogins is studying psychology and has big plans for his future. “I love having in-depth conversations with people to learn why they think and act the way they do.”

He knew from the beginning that North Central State College was where he wanted to continue his educational journey. He explains, “I feel that North Central is a good fit for me because of its intimate environment. The teachers have more one-on-one experience with students.”

“North Central faculty and staff really care about me as a student. I am not just a number to them. They really have gone the extra mile for me, and that’s why I try to go the extra mile for myself, because of those people who believe in me.”

For Laurence Rawls, president of MIMA, giving the scholarship to a local student is all about giving back to the community. “We just wanted to make sure we gave the scholarship to someone who was attending a local college,” he said. “Hopefully they will graduate and want to stay in the community.”

Rawls says MIMA plans to give out scholarships to North Central State College students in the future.

As for Dogins’ future, he would like to continue his education after he graduates from North Central State and eventually obtains his master’s degree.

To find out more about the North Central State College Foundation and scholarships available go to www.ncstatecollege.edu/foundation.

Routine Accreditation Visit

MANSFIELD, OHIO – North Central State College will undergo a comprehensive evaluation visit from the Higher Learning Commission October 8-9, 2018.

The Higher Learning Commission is one of the six regional accrediting agencies in the United States that provide institutional accreditation for institutions of higher education. Institutional accreditation evaluates an entire institution and accredits it as a whole. North Central State College has been accredited by the Higher Learning Commission since 1976.

For the past several years, North Central State College has been in the process of conducting a self-study as a part of accreditation activities. The visit from the Higher Learning Commission is the final step in this process to maintain accreditation.

The public is invited to submit comments regarding North Central State College either online at http://www.hlcommission.org/Student-Resources/third-party-comment.html, or in writing to:

Third-Party Comment on North Central State College

Higher Learning Commission
230 South LaSalle Street, Suite 7-500
Chicago, IL 60604-1411

Comments about North Central State College are due in the Commission offices no later than one month before the October visit. The Commission cannot guarantee that comments received after the due date will be considered. Comments should include the name, address and signature of the person(s) providing the comments. Only signed or otherwise identified comments are considered; comments cannot be anonymous, and are not treated as confidential by the Higher Learning Commission.

About North Central State College

North Central State is a community college that serves 4,400 students on its Mansfield campus, at the Kehoe Center in Shelby, and at the Crawford Success Center in Bucyrus. The College is preparing this area’s workforce by offering more than 70 associate degree and certificate programs of study, including comprehensive technical education in health sciences, general studies, public service, business, engineering technology, and corporate/community services. In addition to technical degrees, North Central State College also offers numerous associate of arts and associate of science degrees, which allow students to transfer credits to other colleges and universities in the pursuit of advanced degrees.

The college offers a wide range of delivery methods including evening and online courses to accommodate students’ schedules. To learn more, visit www.ncstatecollege.edu or call 419-755-4800.

For more information, contact:

Dr. Karen Reed

Vice President for Academic Services

kreed@ncstatecollege.edu
419-755-4538

Cyber Security first graduates

During Commencement 2018, North Central State College will celebrate the graduation of its first six students from the IT-Cyber Security Program.

The graduates are Alexander Parker of Mansfield, Bethany Garber of Ashland, Tristan Gardner of Lexington, Nicole Gibson of Willard, Nicholas McGregor of Butler, and Tyler Westmoreland of Willard.

Mohamed Ghonimy, assistant professor of Cyber Security, began heading the program in 2017. “The classes get the students ready to join the workforce upon graduation,” he explains.

Cyber security student Bethany Garber works on a project in class.“The program has evolved rapidly in the past year with the support of faculty and administration at North Central State College.”

The cyber security program prepares students to detect and defend against network infrastructure attacks. They learn to think like a hacker and how to use the tools hackers use to penetrate network defenses.

Bethany Garber, one of the six graduates, explains why she chose to be a part of the program. “With the way our world is going right now, technology is becoming more and more prominent. As long as technology improves, the need for the cyber security professionals becomes greater.”

“If there is going to be a need for anything in the tech field, it’s going to be security. People are getting smarter and are figuring out how to get your personal information easier.” Garber continues, “I think everyone dealing with any electronic device should at least take a security introduction class.”

All six students graduating from the program will earn an associate of applied science degree in information technology cyber security.

Student building prosthetic arm

Victoria (Tori) Thimmes may only be a teenager but she has big aspirations for her future. Thimmes is building a prosthetic robot arm as part of her project for the College Now program at North Central State College. College-NOW is a two-year program that allows high school juniors to enter college on a track to earn their associate degree as they complete their last two years of high school. She started the College-NOW program as a junior at Buckeye Central High School.

Thimmes knew this was the right program for her. She says, “I came to NC State College and shadowed some of the students, spending the day with them in their classroom.” She continues, “I knew this is what I wanted to do because it’s an associate degree for FREE and you don’t get much better than that.”

Thimmes chose to create a prosthetic arm because of her connection with a coach at Buckeye Central High School, Greg Moore. In 2015, the vehicle Coach Moore was driving was struck by a garbage truck. He lost his left arm.

The idea for the prosthetic arm came to Thimmes when she spotted Moore at the golf course. “I am a golfer and was practicing when I saw Coach Moore trying to hit a ball off a tee. He didn’t have a lot of leverage because he could only use one arm,” she explains.

That gave her the idea to try to build the prosthetic arm as her College-NOW project. She mentioned the project to Moore and he was excited and the possibilities.

Thimmes got started right away. She made most of the essential parts for the prosthetic in the Fab Lab with the 3-D printer.

Thimmes began constructing the arm and testing the materials. “We stretched the materials and compressed it just to see how strong the material is and to make sure it was sturdy enough.” She continues to work on her project and now recruited a team to help. She continues to check in with Coach Moore. She says, “I go back to Buckeye Central somedays just to give him updates on the project. He gets so excited.”

Thimmes will graduate in May with 67 credit hours and her associate degree in integrated engineer technology. She plans to attend either The Ohio State University or the University of Akron majoring in Biomedical Engineering.

For those in high school thinking about attending College-NOW at North Central State College, she gives this advice, “It can be very challenging at first but you really just have to work at it. You have to want it. You have to be motivated enough to keep pushing through and studying. You have to really work at it. You also have to look a few years into the future and say you know that this is going to help me and I should do it no matter how hard it is going to be.”