Criminal Justice, AAS

Graduates of the Criminal Justice program may find employment within city, county, private, and state agencies who are involved with the enforcement of laws, the investigation of criminal acts, corrections, and probation. Positions are also available in the private industry where security and loss prevention are paramount. Some graduates will continue to pursue a bachelor's degree, which expands the employment market to include federal agencies and state agencies.

The qualities that a person should have to be successful include keen powers of observation, mental alertness, emotional stability, ability to work within prescribed rules and regulations, and the ability to handle responsibility and discipline. As the field of criminal justice becomes more sophisticated and complex, advanced training and education become more critical. The two‐year curriculum includes courses in forensic science, juvenile delinquency, drugs and narcotics, family violence, criminal and constitutional law, criminology, and criminal investigations.

INDIVIDUALS WITH A FELONY AND/OR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE CONVICTION OR DRUG CONVICTIONS MAY EXPERIENCE DIFFICULTY GAINING EMPLOYMENT IN THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE FIELD. Students with misdemeanor convictions should seek advice from an advisor in the Criminal Justice program. A fingerprint check is required for .

The Associate of Applied Science degree is awarded for the completion of this program.

Program Learning Outcomes

By the end of the Associate Degree program students will be able to:

  1. Apply the core criminal justice foundation concepts of juvenile justice, criminology, constitutional law, corrections, private security, and U.S. Judicial and Criminal Justice systems in solving and defending logical arguments and applications in the field.
  2. Demonstrate the ability to communicate effectively in writing and speech.
  3. Demonstrate well‐developed analytical and problem solving skills.
  4. Demonstrate proper standards of criminal justice professionalism, morals and ethics.

Where You Could Go

Common work settings include police/ sheriff’s departments, juvenile facilities, city/county probation, correctional facilities, private security agencies and loss-prevention (retail). Many graduates transfer credits to another college or university bachelor degree program.

NC State has over 40 agreements with four-year colleges and universities, to provide a smooth transition for students who want to pursue a bachelor’s degree; some of which are offered on the NC State campus or online.

Job Demand

There are a variety of career choices for criminal justice graduates. The field is stable and generally offers good job security, along with advancement opportunities with further training and education.

Criminal Justice Majors of North Central State College are educated as a whole person in habits of critical thinking, leadership, lifelong learning and are also provided the opportunity to acquire the practical skills needed for competent performance in the changing workplace as well as the opportunity of preparation for advanced education.

Year One

Fall Semester

CRMJ 1010 - Introduction to Criminal Justice & US Judicial Systems

This course introduces the student to the American System of Criminal Justice including growth and historical development. Emphasis will be placed on the criminal justice subsystems of law enforcement, corrections, courts, the Ohio court structure, and the juvenile justice system. In addition, this course will examine the ethical, professional, and legal issues confronting the criminal justice professional.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

CRMJ 1070 - Family Violence

This course examines the characteristics of the growing number of families "on the fault line" of present day society in the United States. The causes and solutions that have been proposed to understand, control, and re-address problems of at-risk families are discussed during this course. Topics of discussion include the characteristics of social intervention, domestic violence, sexual violence, child abuse, exploitation and neglect, crimes against the elderly, and victim rights/issues. This course further examines the professional and criminal justice response to these issues.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

ENGL 1010 - English Composition I

This is a basic course in expository writing and critical reading. Students read a variety of nonfiction works and write summaries, analysis, essays, and a researched argument in response to their reading. Students learn to read actively and accurately and to organize, develop, and revise coherent papers appropriate for a college-educated audience. (OTM for First Writing Course TME001)

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Required Prerequisite Course: ENGL 0040; (minimum grade of C-), or qualifying placement test scores

PSYC 1010 - Introduction to Psychology

Introduction to Psychology is an introductory level course and is a study of the basic human behavior. Topics include the history of psychology, scientific methods, biological processes, cognitive processes, sensation and perception, consciousness, learning, intelligence, human development, personality theory, psychopathology and treatment, stress and health, and social psychology. Please note outcomes are written to OBR standards using OBR language. Ohio Articulation Number OSS015. This course meets the requirements for OTM in Social and Behavioral Science TMSBS

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

STAT 1010 - Probability and Statistics

This course provides the student with an overview of probability and statistics. Probability terminology, concepts and rules are emphasized in solving probability problems. Descriptive statistics, including measures of central tendency and dispersion, charts, tables and diagrams are used to summarize data. The student is introduced to the binomial, Poisson, hyper-geometric, normal and t-distributions. Confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation, and linear regression are used to make conclusions concerning population parameters from sample data. This course meets the requirements for OTM Introductory Statistics TMM010.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

Spring Semester

COMM 1010 - Speech

This course involves instruction and experience in giving a presentation. Students are taught the principles of speech content and delivery so that they can effectively participate in a variety of practical speaking situations. Presentations will include the informative speech, persuasive speech, visual aid/demonstration speech, impromptu speech, and group presentation. (OTM for Oral Communication TMCOM and TAG# OCM013)

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

CRMJ 1090 - Juvenile Delinquency

This course provides an overview of the current theoretical and methodological issues concerning juvenile delinquency. This course examines the nature, extent, and causes of juvenile delinquency. The course is structured to focus on the social construction of delinquency, the development of the juvenile justice system, theoretical explanations of delinquency, and the current research on juvenile delinquency in the United States. The primary objectives of this course are to foster critical thinking about how we define, address, research, punish, and treat delinquency in America.

Credit Hours: 4
Lecture Hours: 4

CRMJ 1110 - Criminal Investigation I

This course introduces the student to the study of investigative procedures beginning with the preliminary investigation through the follow-up phase. Additional topics covered within this course include documenting the crime scene, death investigations, interviewing techniques, evidence recognition, identification and collection. The laboratory experience will provide actual investigation situations to enhance student learning.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 2
Lab Hours: 3

CRMJ 1130 - Introduction to Corrections

This course provides students with an overview of the field of corrections including courts, detention, sentencing, adult institutions, and staffing and personnel issues. This course provides the student with a basic working knowledge of the many diverse aspects of the correctional process with emphasis given to the history and development of corrections, the various types of institutions, the correctional process, correctional treatment, and the role of corrections within the field of criminal justice. This course specifically examines the Ohio Correctional System.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

SOCY 1010 - Introduction to Sociology

Introduction to the theoretical foundations and methods used to gather, interpret, and evaluate data in sociology. Insight into how society is organized by focusing on the structure and function of social institutions, the impact of culture and socialization on individuals and groups, and systems of stratification among various racial and ethnic, social class, gender and sexuality groups. Please note outcomes are written to OBR standards using OBR language. Ohio Articulation Number OSS021. This course meets the requirements for OTM in Social and Behavioral Science TMSBS.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

SOCY 2010 - Cultural Diversity and Racism

Sociological exploration of American racial and ethnic groups. Emphasis placed on the social construction of race and ethnicity, patterns of intergroup contact. Historical comparative analysis of selected groups with emphasis on economic, political and structural inequalities. Please note outcomes are written to OBR standards using OBR language. Ohio Articulation Number OSS 050 Race and Ethnicity . This course also meets the requirements for OTM in Social and Behavioral Sciences TMSBS.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

Year Two

Fall Semester

BIOL 1101 - Nutrition

BIOL 1101 is an introductory course to the principles of nutrition and its relationship to health. Included are practical applications in daily life as well as nutritional assessments of individuals. Emphasis is on essential nutrients, their supply and function, as related to an individual's well-being. Health promotion and chronic disease are explored in relation to today's society. (TAG# OHL016)

Credit Hours: 2
Lecture Hours: 2

PSYC 2170 - Forensic Psychology

This course will examine the relationship between psychology and different components of the criminal justice system. An introduction to the field of forensic psychology will be provided and examination of some different types of criminal behavior will occur. Applications of psychological principles to the resolution of problems within the criminal justice field will also be explored.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Required Prerequisite Course: Take PSYC 1010

CRMJ 1050 - Criminal and Constitutional Law

This course will examine past and current legal cases and court decisions. Emphasis will be placed on the Bill of Rights and specific amendments that pertain to the criminal justice field. The basic concepts of criminal law will also be examined concerning criminal statutes and elements for selected offenses for the State of Ohio.

Credit Hours: 4
Lecture Hours: 4

CRMJ 2010 - Criminology

The purpose of this course is to study crime and criminality in modern society with an emphasis on the underlying assumptions, propositions, and supporting evidence of crime theories. This course examines the multi-disciplinary science of law-making, law-breaking, and law-enforcing. A major emphasis will be placed on the evolution of criminological theories and review of data that assists in predicting where, when, by whom and against whom crimes happen.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

CRMJ 2036 - Report Writing for Criminal Justice Professional

This course will examine and explore the various types of reports utilized in the Criminal Justice System/Field. This course will enable the student to develop report writing skills that are essential to the Criminal Justice Field and Criminal Justice Professionals.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

Spring Semester

CRMJ 2110 - Private Security I

This course examines the historical, philosophical, and legal framework of the private security field. Security organization, policies, personnel roles, contract and proprietary security concepts are examined within this course. An emphasis of this course is placed on creating security awareness and relationships with other organizations, discovering security's place/role in the criminal justice system, and examining the practice of privatization in security.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

CRMJ 2130 - Community Based Corrections

This course examines programs for convicted offenders that are used both as alternatives to incarceration and post-incarceration situations. Topics include the types of offenders, diversion, house arrest, restitution, community service, probation and parole, including both public and private participation, and other related topics. This course examines the various programs available as alternatives to incarceration from the perspective of the criminal justice professional, the offender, and the community

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

CRMJ 2190 - Practicum and Seminar

This course involves placement of the student into an actual work environment within a setting in the Criminal Justice field. The work experience includes job tasks and assignments providing exposure of the functions of the various Criminal Justice fields. The student will complete 210 hours of work experience at the placement site. This work experience provides the foundation for developing the student into a competent criminal justice worker. This course further involves discussions of the operations, issues and events of the placement of the student in a Criminal Justice work environment. This course is graded as a Pass/No Pass course.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 1
Practicum Hours: 14

HUMA 1010 - Introduction to the Humanities

This course is a genre-based introduction to the humanities and the fine arts. The student will explore the six major means of artistic expression within the fine arts: painting, literature, drama, film, photography, and sculpture. The course focuses on an understanding of the genre itself as well as the various critical theories that apply to the fine arts, including but not necessarily limited to mimesis, formalism, didacticism, and postmodernism. Field trips are required in the course. This course meets the requirements for OTM in Arts and Humanities TMAH.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Required Prerequisite Course: ENGL 0040 (minimum grade of C-); OR qualifying placement test score

PHIL 1110 - Ethics

This course involves an examination of several ethical theories, including ethical relativism, utilitarianism, virtue ethics, social contract ethics, theological ethics, and rational ethics. Subjects covered may include the ethics of nuclear war, the ethics of suicide, ethical issues in abortion, the ethics of euthanasia, ethical issues in genetic engineering, sexual ethics, racism and sexism, capital punishment, ethics and the environment and so on. This course meets the requirements for OTM Arts and Humanities TMAH and slso TAG# OAH046.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

Total Credit Hours: 65

Basic Electives

Courses

CRMJ 1150 - Success Skills for Criminal Justice Prof

This course provides students with an introduction to personal vision, leadership, and management concepts. This course further introduces to the student, their role and responsibilities in the field of criminal justice and how to balance this with the demands of their personal life. Topics include interpersonal leadership, empathic communication, creative cooperation, self-renewal, and situational leadership concepts that law enforcement professionals and agencies encounter within the criminal justice field.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

CRMJ 2032 - Gangs Cults and Terrorism

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the structure, organization, and psychology of gangs. Investigation techniques concerning gang recognition by tattoos, graffiti, and symbols will be included for street, prison and motorcycle gangs. This course will also familiarize the student of the various cult organizations. This course will also examine the structure, and current trends of domestic and international terrorist organizations. Semesters Available: Day - F, SP Eve - F, Sp

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

CRMJ 2050 - Drug Recognition

This course studies the social and physical implications of legal and illegal drugs and substances. Drug and substance usage and its psychological and physiological impacts are also discussed for each of the various categories of substances that are seen in society today.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

CRMJ 2115 - Criminal Investigations II

This course requires the student to apply his/her knowledge and training in practical situations relating to criminal investigations/cases. The student will prepare case and lab reports concerning their conclusions and findings of crime specific cases/offenses. The laboratory experience will provide actual investigative learning.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 2
Lab Hours: 3

CRMJ 2150 - Forensic Science/Criminalistics I

This is an introductory course to criminalistics which explores the history and scope of forensic science. Criminalistics is the application of science to those criminal and civil laws that are enforced by police agencies in a criminal justice system. The scope of this course includes discovery at a crime scene, the most important location of evidence; physical evidence; analytical techniques for organic and inorganic materials, fingerprints, unique tool marks, trace evidence and various impressions (e.g., shoe prints, tire prints, etc.)

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 2
Lab Hours: 3

CRMJ 2152 - Forensic Science/Criminalistics II

This is an introductory course to criminalistics which explores the scope of forensic science. The scope of this course includes procedures and practices of; Forensic Serology, Toxicology, Presumptive Drug Testing, Paint Analysis, Blood Spatter, and Ballistics. The laboratory experience will provide actual lab situations and scenarios to enhance student learning.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 2
Lab Hours: 3

CRMJ 2154 - Forensic Science/Criminalistics III

This is an introductory course to criminalistics which explores the scope of forensic science. The scope of this course includes; procedures and practices of questioned documents, handwriting analysis, type-writing analysis, anthropology, and odontology. The laboratory experience will provide actual lab situations and scenarios to enhance student learning.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 2
Lab Hours: 3

PSYC 2050 - Abnormal Psychology

This course will examine the definition, classification, origin, and treatment of abnormal behavior. Categories of disorders discussed will include personality, anxiety, mood, somatoform, dissociative, sexual, psychotic, developmental- related and addictive disorders. Research methodology in abnormal psychology, historical perspective, the assessment process, ethical issues and use of the DSM will also be emphasized. Please note outcomes are written to OBR standards using OBR language. Ohio Articulation Number OSS017. This course meets the requirements for OTM in Social and Behavioral Science TMSBS

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Required Prerequisite Course: Take PSYC 1010;