Criminal Justice Focus, AA

The Associate of Arts and the Associate of Science degree programs are designed for students who are planning to transfer to a four‐year college or university and pursue baccalaureate degree programs. The curriculum fulfills the freshman and sophomore general education requirements of most four‐year colleges and universities. Effective general education helps students gain competence in the exercise of independent intellectual inquiry and also stimulates their examination of understanding of personal, social and civic values. In addition, these degrees will fulfill the requirements for the Ohio Transfer Module at other public colleges and universities. In essence, upon completion of the Associate of Arts or the Associate of Science, students will have a well‐rounded general education to augment the final two years required for a Bachelor's degree.

Year One

Fall Semester

COMM 1010 - Speech

This course involves instruction and experience in giving a presentation. Students are taught the principles of speech content and delivery so that they can effectively participate in a variety of practical speaking situations. Presentations will include the informative speech, persuasive speech, visual aid/demonstration speech, impromptu speech, and group presentation. (OTM for Oral Communication TMCOM and TAG# OCM013)

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

CRMJ 1010 - Introduction to Criminal Justice & US Judicial Systems

This course introduces the student to the American System of Criminal Justice including growth and historical development. Emphasis will be placed on the criminal justice subsystems of law enforcement, corrections, courts, the Ohio court structure, and the juvenile justice system. In addition, this course will examine the ethical, professional, and legal issues confronting the criminal justice professional.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

ENGL 1010 - English Composition I

This is a basic course in expository writing and critical reading. Students read a variety of nonfiction works and write summaries, analysis, essays, and a researched argument in response to their reading. Students learn to read actively and accurately and to organize, develop, and revise coherent papers appropriate for a college-educated audience. (OTM for First Writing Course TME001)

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Required Prerequisite Course: ENGL 0040; (minimum grade of C-), or qualifying placement test scores

PSYC 1010 - Introduction to Psychology

Introduction to Psychology is an introductory level course and is a study of the basic human behavior. Topics include the history of psychology, scientific methods, biological processes, cognitive processes, sensation and perception, consciousness, learning, intelligence, human development, personality theory, psychopathology and treatment, stress and health, and social psychology. Please note outcomes are written to OBR standards using OBR language. Ohio Articulation Number OSS015. This course meets the requirements for OTM in Social and Behavioral Science TMSBS

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

SOCY 1010 - Introduction to Sociology

Introduction to the theoretical foundations and methods used to gather, interpret, and evaluate data in sociology. Insight into how society is organized by focusing on the structure and function of social institutions, the impact of culture and socialization on individuals and groups, and systems of stratification among various racial and ethnic, social class, gender and sexuality groups. Please note outcomes are written to OBR standards using OBR language. Ohio Articulation Number OSS021. This course meets the requirements for OTM in Social and Behavioral Science TMSBS.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

Spring Semester

CRMJ 1130 - Introduction to Corrections

This course provides students with an overview of the field of corrections including courts, detention, sentencing, adult institutions, and staffing and personnel issues. This course provides the student with a basic working knowledge of the many diverse aspects of the correctional process with emphasis given to the history and development of corrections, the various types of institutions, the correctional process, correctional treatment, and the role of corrections within the field of criminal justice. This course specifically examines the Ohio Correctional System.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

ENGL 1030 - English Composition II

This is a course in argument and research writing. Students read issue-based works and write summaries, responses, and an argument and research paper. Students learn to organize research projects, find and evaluate sources, incorporate ideas and quotations from sources, document their sources in MLA and APA style, analyze and use argumentative strategies and persuasive appeals, and prepare and revise effective, coherent papers. (OTM for Second Writing Course TME002)

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Required Prerequisite Course: Take ENGL 1010 with a minimum grade of C- or better.

HUMA 1010 - Introduction to the Humanities

This course is a genre-based introduction to the humanities and the fine arts. The student will explore the six major means of artistic expression within the fine arts: painting, literature, drama, film, photography, and sculpture. The course focuses on an understanding of the genre itself as well as the various critical theories that apply to the fine arts, including but not necessarily limited to mimesis, formalism, didacticism, and postmodernism. Field trips are required in the course. This course meets the requirements for OTM in Arts and Humanities TMAH.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Required Prerequisite Course: ENGL 0040 (minimum grade of C-); OR qualifying placement test score

SOCY 2010 - Cultural Diversity and Racism

Sociological exploration of American racial and ethnic groups. Emphasis placed on the social construction of race and ethnicity, patterns of intergroup contact. Historical comparative analysis of selected groups with emphasis on economic, political and structural inequalities. Please note outcomes are written to OBR standards using OBR language. Ohio Articulation Number OSS 050 Race and Ethnicity . This course also meets the requirements for OTM in Social and Behavioral Sciences TMSBS.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

STAT 1010 - Probability and Statistics

This course provides the student with an overview of probability and statistics. Probability terminology, concepts and rules are emphasized in solving probability problems. Descriptive statistics, including measures of central tendency and dispersion, charts, tables and diagrams are used to summarize data. The student is introduced to the binomial, Poisson, hyper-geometric, normal and t-distributions. Confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation, and linear regression are used to make conclusions concerning population parameters from sample data. This course meets the requirements for OTM Introductory Statistics TMM010.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

Year Two

Fall Semester

BIOL 1230 - Biology I

This course is an introduction to biology for bioscience majors and students planning to transfer to four year institutions. The course will introduce fundamental concepts of biology including the scientific method, structure and chemical properties of cells. The course will introduce students to biochemical pathways, bioenergetics, and basic concepts of genetics, heredity and homeostasis. Historical contributions and application of biological principles to biotechnology will be discussed. Students will meet three lecture hours and three lab hours per week. Semesters available: Day - F

Credit Hours: 4
Lecture Hours: 3
Lab Hours: 3
Required Prerequisite Course: Take ENGL 0040 and MATH 0084 (minimum grade of C- required for all) OR qualifying placement test scores.

GEOL 1010 - Physical Geology

Physical Geology is an introductory course describing the fundamental concepts of Geology for Non-Science majors. These fundamental concepts are grouped in 7 modules: Module I (Geology, Earth Science, and the Scientific Method) is an introduction to the science of Geology and its many branches; this module also discusses the steps in the scientific method, and describes the systems approach to geology. Module II (Origin and Evolution of Earth) discusses the formation of the universe and the solar system, and introduces Earth's neighbors in the solar system. Module III (Plate Tectonics and the Dynamic Earth) discusses Earth's internal structure and introduces the theory of plate tectonics, a unifying idea that explains Earth's surface processes and features. Module IV (Earth Materials: Minerals and Rocks) discusses the materials from which Earth is made, as well as their structure and classification. Module V (Structural Geology) describes how Earth's internal and external processes interact to produce earthquakes and mountains. Module VI (Energy Resources) describes the energy resources that the Earth provides us and how they are produced and used. Module VII (Hydrology and Stream Geomorphology) discusses how water shapes the surface of our planet and helps create a multitude of erosional and depositional landforms. TAG# OSC025

Credit Hours: 4
Lecture Hours: 3
Lab Hours: 2

CRMJ 2010 - Criminology

The purpose of this course is to study crime and criminality in modern society with an emphasis on the underlying assumptions, propositions, and supporting evidence of crime theories. This course examines the multi-disciplinary science of law-making, law-breaking, and law-enforcing. A major emphasis will be placed on the evolution of criminological theories and review of data that assists in predicting where, when, by whom and against whom crimes happen.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

HIST 1010 - American History I

This American Studies course is an introductory survey course covering the development of American politics, law, religion, philosophy, art and literature from 1600 to 1877. The goal of the course is to help students understand the cultural development of the United States especially in relation to its religion, art, philosophy, law, and political system. (TAG# OHS043 or if combined with HIST1030 OHS010. This course also meets the requirements for the OTM Arts and Humanities - TMAH)

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

HIST 1050 - Western Civilization I

This course presents an overview of European civilization from antiquity to about the year 1600, stressing the chief political, social, cultural, and religious developments within this span of time. This class will help students gain a better understanding of the historical narrative of European civilization, particularly as it relates to political institutions and structures and social and cultural developments; develop improved textual interpretation skills through the careful reading and discussion of ancient and medieval texts; and refine their ability to express ideas and produce convincing arguments through writing essays and short paper.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

POLT 1010 - American National Government

This course involves an examination of the people, values, institutions, processes, and policies associated with American government. Special emphasis is given to the way in which all of the variables interact to form the dynamic that is American politics. This course meets the requirements for OTM in Social and Behavioral Science TMSBS

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

SPAN 1010 - Beginning Spanish I

This course develops basic speaking, listening, writing and reading skills.  The goal is for students to achieve a Novice Mid-level of proficiency across all the aforementioned skills.  At this level, students will be able to engage in simple interpersonal exchanges. They will also be able to present and understand information about themselves and their immediate surroundings using words, phrases and memorized expressions while speaking and listening, reproduce from memory a modest number of words and phrases in context while writing, and identify a number of highly contextualized words and phrases including cognates and borrowed words while reading.  Also, students will have an introduction to Hispanic Cultures by examining a variety of topics. This course is not intended for native speakers of Spanish.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

ENGL 2050 - American Literature I

American Literature I is a survey course that examines the development of American literature in English from the early colonies through the Civil War. Through the use of selected texts, students will become familiar with key authors and works that represent American literature in English and the multiple voices within it. As a survey course, American Literature I is designed to provide students with a foundational understanding of the historical and cultural conditions that influenced the development and formation of American literature. This course will provide the necessary background for a more in-depth understanding of and appreciation for American literature not covered in the course, and it will prepare students for more advanced study of literature in general. (TAG# OAH053)

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Required Prerequisite Course: Take ENGL 1030; Minimum Grade C-

Spring Semester

BIOL 1231 - Biology II

This course is continuation of BIOL 1230 - Biology I. The course will introduce fundamental concepts of biology including evolution, classification, ecosystems, similarities and differences, among plants, animals and microorganisms in form and function. Historical contributions and application of biological principles to biotechnology will be discussed. Students will meet three lecture hours and three lab hours per week. Semesters Available Day - Sp

Credit Hours: 4
Lecture Hours: 3
Lab Hours: 3
Required Prerequisite Course: Take BIOL 1230

GEOL 1030 - Historical Geology

Historical Geology is an introductory course describing the fundamental concepts of Geology for Non-Science majors. It contains 12 individual lessons grouped in 3 modules. Module I - Fundamental Concepts explains the basic concepts of historical geology including, earth materials and geologic time. Module II - The Evolution of the Earth and Life through Time follows the evolutionary processes of both the solid Earth and biology through time. Module III - A Closer Look into the Major Time Periods is an in depth look into each of the 5 major time periods with the focus on the biologic evolution.

Credit Hours: 4
Lecture Hours: 3
Lab Hours: 2

CRMJ 1090 - Juvenile Delinquency

This course provides an overview of the current theoretical and methodological issues concerning juvenile delinquency. This course examines the nature, extent, and causes of juvenile delinquency. The course is structured to focus on the social construction of delinquency, the development of the juvenile justice system, theoretical explanations of delinquency, and the current research on juvenile delinquency in the United States. The primary objectives of this course are to foster critical thinking about how we define, address, research, punish, and treat delinquency in America.

Credit Hours: 4
Lecture Hours: 4

HIST 1030 - American History II

This American Studies course is an introductory survey course covering the development of American politics, law, religion, philosophy, art and literature from 1877 to the present. The goal of the course is to help students understand the cultural maturity of the United States especially in relation to its religion, art, philosophy, law, and political system. (TAG# OHS044 or if combined with HIST1030 OHS010. This course also meets the requirements for the OTM Arts and Humanities - TMAH)

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

HIST 1070 - Western Civilization II

This course presents an overview of European civilization from around 1500 to the present, stressing the chief political, social, cultural, and religious developments within this span of time. This class will help students gain a better knowledge of the historical narrative of European civilization, particularly as it relates to political institutions and structures and social and cultural developments; develop improved textual interpretation skills through the careful reading and discussion of historical texts; and refine their ability to express ideas and produce convincing arguments through writing essays and a short paper.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

PSYC 2050 - Abnormal Psychology

This course will examine the definition, classification, origin, and treatment of abnormal behavior. Categories of disorders discussed will include personality, anxiety, mood, somatoform, dissociative, sexual, psychotic, developmental- related and addictive disorders. Research methodology in abnormal psychology, historical perspective, the assessment process, ethical issues and use of the DSM will also be emphasized. Please note outcomes are written to OBR standards using OBR language. Ohio Articulation Number OSS017. This course meets the requirements for OTM in Social and Behavioral Science TMSBS

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Required Prerequisite Course: Take PSYC 1010;

PSYC 2170 - Forensic Psychology

This course will examine the relationship between psychology and different components of the criminal justice system. An introduction to the field of forensic psychology will be provided and examination of some different types of criminal behavior will occur. Applications of psychological principles to the resolution of problems within the criminal justice field will also be explored.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Required Prerequisite Course: Take PSYC 1010

SPAN 1020 - Beginning Spanish II

SPAN1020 is a continuation of SPAN 1010 with more advanced practice in listening, reading, speaking (spoken presentations as well as interpersonal exchanges), and writing with an emphasis on practical Spanish. Course includes introduction to Hispanic culture on selected topics. Prerequisite: Two years of high school Spanish or SPAN 1010 (C or above). This course is not intended for native speakers of Spanish. Semesters Available: Day-Sp

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Required Prerequisite Course: Take SPAN 1010; Minimum Grade C;

ENGL 2070 - American Literature II

American Literature II is a survey course that examines the development of American literature in English from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. Through the use of selected texts, students will become familiar with key authors and works that represent American literature in English and the multiple voices within it. As a survey course, American Literature II is designed to provide students with a foundational understanding of the historical and cultural conditions that influenced the development and formation of American literature. This course will provide the necessary background for a more in-depth understanding of and appreciation for American literature not covered in the course, and it will prepare students for more advanced study of literature in general. TAG # OAH054

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Required Prerequisite Course: Take ENGL 1030; Minimum Grade C-

Total Credit Hours: 63