Bioscience, AAS

Bioscience covers a wide selection of scientific disciplines that aims to improve the quality of life of humans, plants, and animals. Biotechnology is an old area of study. Earliest examples include selective breeding to produce livestock and crops with desired physical traits and the use of microorganisms to produce foods such as cheese and select beverages.

One important aspect of the bioscience industry is stability. According to Cleveland State University's Center for Economic Development, overall employment opportunities within the state of Ohio have fallen. However, the bioscience or biotechnology sector has continued to grow and add jobs.

The successful student will be a dedicated individual who will acquire the technical skills and attention to detail necessary to carry out complex tests and procedures in a wide variety of laboratory settings. Work settings include medical research, agricultural research, product testing, pharmacology, forensics, and manufacturing.

Areas of study included in the curriculum include microbiology, histology, plant, and animal bioscience, genetics, pharmacology, and toxicology.  In addition, good laboratory practices are emphasized along with proper laboratory notebook composition.

The Associate of Science degree is awarded at the completion of the program. A minimum grade of C is required in , , , , , , and all BIOS courses in order to meet education and graduation requirements.

Program Learning Outcomes

  1. Students will demonstrate competence in standard laboratory techniques and use of technology and equipment.
  2. Students will demonstrate the ability to research and communicate (visually, orally and in writing) credible scientific information from a variety of sources.
  3. Students will collect, analyze and interpret data using the scientific method.
  4. Students will calculate, analyze, solve, interpret, and graph quantitative data.

Where You Could Go

Jobs are available for Bioscience graduates today, and for the foreseeable future. You could find employment in medical research, agricultural research, product testing, criminal investigation and pharmacology research.

Transfer Pathways

NC State maintains formal transfer agreements with four year colleges and universities throughout the state of Ohio. These should help you make a smooth transition toward your bachelor’s degree, or beyond. In addition, opportunities may be available to pursue further education in specific areas of study while working in the field.

Job Demand

There is a regional and national need for Bioscience Technicians in all areas of research. This career is in early stages of development and has future growth prospects.

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Year One

Fall Semester

BIOL 1230 - Biology I

This course is an introduction to biology for bioscience majors and students planning to transfer to four year institutions. The course will introduce fundamental concepts of biology including the scientific method, structure and chemical properties of cells. The course will introduce students to biochemical pathways, bioenergetics, and basic concepts of genetics, heredity and homeostasis. Historical contributions and application of biological principles to biotechnology will be discussed. Students will meet three lecture hours and three lab hours per week. Semesters available: Day - F

Credit Hours: 4
Lecture Hours: 3
Lab Hours: 3
Required Prerequisite Course: Take ENGL 0040 and MATH 0084 (minimum grade of C- required for all) OR qualifying placement test scores.

BIOS 1010 - Introduction to Bioscience Lab Technique

Introduction to Bioscience Lab Techniques is designed to give students an introduction to the scientific concepts and laboratory research techniques currently used in the field of biotechnology. Students develop basic laboratory skills by the examination of the various instruments and methods of analysis used in the laboratory today. It will begin with general safety procedures utilized in every lab, and cover more specific issues relating to certain analytical protocol. Critical thinking and communication skills currently used in the biotechnology industry will begin in this course and continue throughout the program. Through reading assignments, laboratory work, and workplace experiences, students will explore and evaluate career opportunities in the field of biotechnology. Semesters available: Day - F

Credit Hours: 4
Lecture Hours: 2
Required Prerequisite Course: Take ENGL 0040, MATH 0084, CHEM 1010 with a minimum grade of C-.
Required Concurrent Course: Take BIOS 1010L

BIOS 1030 - Environmental Science

Environmental Biotechnology is designed to give students an introduction to the scientific concepts and laboratory research techniques currently used in the field of environmental biotechnology. Students develop laboratory skills, critical thinking, and communication skills currently used in the industry. Topics covered will include environmental pollution monitoring, sewage treatment including domestic, agricultural, and industrial waste, bioremediation, biofuels, other clean biotechnology techniques, laboratory work, and workplace experiences via off-site tours. Semesters available: Day - F

Credit Hours: 4
Lecture Hours: 2
Required Concurrent Course: Take BIOS 1030L

MATH 1110 - College Algebra

A study of: 1) polynomial operations, rational expressions, exponents, radicals; 2) linear and quadratic equations, inequalities, absolute value applications and their graphs; 3) graphs of elementary functions and non-functions including inverse functions, combining functions, and translating and transforming functions; 4) study of polynomial functions including the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra, zeroes of polynomials, rational functions, partial fractions; 5) exponential and logarithmic functions including graphs and applications; 6) Gauss-Jordan elimination and Cramer's Rule. This course meets the requirements for OTM College Algebra TMM001.

Credit Hours: 4
Lecture Hours: 4
Required Prerequisite Course: MATH 0084 (Minimum grade of C- required) or qualifying placement test score

Spring Semester

BIOL 1231 - Biology II

This course is continuation of BIOL 1230 - Biology I. The course will introduce fundamental concepts of biology including evolution, classification, ecosystems, similarities and differences, among plants, animals and microorganisms in form and function. Historical contributions and application of biological principles to biotechnology will be discussed. Students will meet three lecture hours and three lab hours per week. Semesters Available Day - Sp

Credit Hours: 4
Lecture Hours: 3
Lab Hours: 3
Required Prerequisite Course: Take BIOL 1230

BIOS 1210 - Histology

This course is designed for students who are interested in medicine and human or animal biology. The goal of this course is to introduce students to tissues that make up organs and the basic design of each of the major organs. Students will identify tissues using photographs, microscope slides, photographic slides, videotapes, and the internet (histology sites). In addition, fundamental histological techniques important to the preparation of microscope slides will be included in this course. Students will learn how to prepare tissues, embed tissues, use a microtome, and stain differentially as an aid to the identification of tissues. Finally, students will prepare slides of various tissues.

Credit Hours: 4
Lecture Hours: 2
Required Prerequisite Course: Take BIOS 1010;
Required Concurrent Course: Take BIOS 1210L

BIOS 2440 - Introduction to Agricultural Science

This course is required for all students in the Bioscience Program. The course will provide an overview of methods and applications of modern agricultural biotechnology. Molecular techniques specific to genetic-engineering and their analysis will be discussed in this course. It is based on lectures, research and lab. This course contains five parts: the basic science of gene and gene manipulation; valuable genes for agricultural biology, applications of molecular technologies to plant, animal and nutritional scientific research. We will address the ethical, legal and social implications of advances in biotechnology. We will discuss governmental regulation of food, drugs, and biotechnology itself. Biotechnology has been used in food production for thousands of years (e.g. brewing, yogurt, pickling, etc.). The new biotechnology has a high potential in food production and processing. This course will cover the applications of new biotechnology in food production or processing.

Credit Hours: 4
Lecture Hours: 2
Lab Hours: 4
Required Prerequisite Course: Take BIOS 1010 BIOL 1230;

ENGL 1010 - English Composition I

This is a basic course in expository writing and critical reading. Students read a variety of nonfiction works and write summaries, analysis, essays, and a researched argument in response to their reading. Students learn to read actively and accurately and to organize, develop, and revise coherent papers appropriate for a college-educated audience. (OTM for First Writing Course TME001)

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Required Prerequisite Course: ENGL 0040; (minimum grade of C-), or qualifying placement test scores

Year Two

Fall Semester

BIOL 1550 - Microbiology for Health Professionals

This course is designed for allied health and nursing majors. It explores the major groups of microorganisms and the role they play in the environment and in disease. The host-parasite relationship, human immunity to disease, epidemiology, and the control of microorganisms are also addressed. Laboratory exercises provide the student with the basic techniques of microbial identification, microscopy, sterile technique, and basic infection control. (OTM approved course for Natural SciencesTMNS) Day - F, Sp Evening - F

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 2
Required Concurrent Course: Take BIOL 1550L

BIOS 2410 - Advance Bioscience Techniques

This course will focus on Molecular Biology and will examine the advanced instruments and methods of analysis used in the laboratory today. The course will include a comprehensive review of advanced bioscience laboratory techniques utilized in the field today to include indications, process, advantages, disadvantages, analytical protocols, and performing specific laboratory techniques. Students will complete a semester long research project using a model organism which will encompass some of the major molecular biology techniques. Students will then write up results in the form of a scientific publication.

Credit Hours: 4
Lecture Hours: 2
Required Prerequisite Course: Take BIOS 1010.

CHEM 1210 - Chemistry I

This is the first semester of chemistry for science majors or pre-professional students. A quantitative introduction to dimensional analysis with significant figures, atomic structure, the molecule, principles of ionic bonding, stoichiometry, chemical solutions, thermochemistry, classification of elements including periodicity, electron configuration, gases, liquids, and solids. Student will be exposed to applications of chemistry in society. (TAG# OSC008; If combined with CHEM 1220 TAG# OSC023)

Credit Hours: 5
Lecture Hours: 4
Lab Hours: 3
Required Prerequisite Course: High School Chemistry (minimum of C- required) -AND- MATH 1110 (minimum of C- required) or qualifying placement test score

ENGL 1030 - English Composition II

This is a course in argument and research writing. Students read issue-based works and write summaries, responses, and an argument and research paper. Students learn to organize research projects, find and evaluate sources, incorporate ideas and quotations from sources, document their sources in MLA and APA style, analyze and use argumentative strategies and persuasive appeals, and prepare and revise effective, coherent papers. (OTM for Second Writing Course TME002)

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Required Prerequisite Course: Take ENGL 1010 with a minimum grade of C- or better.

HLST 1010 - CPR/First Aid

A practical course in the care and handling of victims of common emergencies; i.e., transportation and household accidents, climate related emergencies. Areas include basic life support, victim assessment, shock, bleeding, bandaging, splinting, burns, poisoning, medical emergencies, rescue and moving victims, triage. Students will receive both Basic Life Support for Heath Care Provider (CPR & AED) and Heart saver First Aid (Adult First Aid/Environmental Emergencies) cards from the American Heart Association. Semesters available: Day - F, Sp, Su Evening - F, Sp, Su

Credit Hours: 1
Lecture Hours: 1

Spring Semester

BIOS 2530 - Genetics

During this course we will discusses the principles of genetics with application to the study of biological function at the level of molecules, cells, and multicellular organisms, including humans. The topics include: structure and function of genes, chromosomes and genomes, biological variation resulting from recombination, mutation, and selection, population genetics, use of genetic methods to analyze protein function, gene regulation and inherited disease.

Credit Hours: 4
Lecture Hours: 3
Lab Hours: 3
Required Prerequisite Course: Take BIOS 2410

BIOS 2550 - Pharmaceutical & Toxicology Bioscience

This course is intended to give students an overview of basic Pharmaceutical and Toxicology concepts and methods. The overall organization of the course is grouped into three sections: Part I (Introduction), Part II (Methodologies), and Part III (Analysis). Parts I and II comprise approximately one-half the course and Part III the remaining half. This course is based on lectures, labs, and project assignments, and is to help the student (1) understand the various techniques in biotechnology, their applications in the manufacturing of biopharmaceuticals, and biomedical research; (2) gain knowledge in some of the physicochemical properties, pharmacology and the formulation of commonly used biopharmaceuticals; and (3) understand the principles of the mechanism of some biotechnologically derived diagnostic aids/tests.

Credit Hours: 4
Lecture Hours: 2
Lab Hours: 4
Required Prerequisite Course: Take BIOS 2410, CHEM 1210;
Required Concurrent Course: Take BIOS 2530

BIOS 2590 - Bioscience Internship/Seminar

This course is designed to provide the student with hands-on experience within the bioscience field. This course involves placement of the student in an actual work environment that will integrate the student's knowledge and laboratory skills acquired within the core coursework of the bioscience program. The student will complete 105 hours of practicum experience at the placement site for 12 weeks. This work experience provides the foundation for developing the student into a competent bioscience laboratory technician. As part of this course the student will return to campus and attend a seminar offered concurrently with the practicum learning. The purpose of the seminar is to critique the experiences of the student in the facility. Specifically, the seminar will focus on professionalism, understanding of the work setting, and the acquisition of knowledge and skills related to obtaining a position as a bio-technician.

Credit Hours: 2
Practicum Hours: 7
Seminar Hours: 1
Required Prerequisite Course: Take BIOS 2410

Total Credit Hours: 60

Social Science Electives

Courses

COMM 2010 - Group Communication

Group Communication explores the many facets of working and communicating in small groups. Emphasis is placed on learning the basic terms, principles, and theories of small group communication thus enabling participants to understand various types of group participation: leadership, roles, goal setting and achieving, conflict management, decision making, and problem solving. Students will analyze, adjust, and improve their own communication behaviors in groups. (This course may NOT be substituted for COMM 1010 - Speech) Semesters available: Offered based on need.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

COMM 2030 - Interpersonal Communication

Interpersonal Communication explores the development, maintenance, and termination of interpersonal (one-on-one) relationships within one's workplace, family, friendships, and love relationships. Emphasis is placed on understanding one's concept of self, perception of others, active listening, handling conflict, learning verbal and nonverbal cues, understanding power and influence, and valuing diversity. Students will analyze, adjust, and improve their communication behaviors by critically applying interpersonal theories in a variety of communication contexts. (This course may NOT be substituted for COMM 1010) TAG# OCM002

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

COMM 2250 - Interviewing

This course will explore the theory and practice of interviewing; interview structures, questioning techniques and formats, cover letters, resumes, and the different types of interviews. Specific practice in Selection and Workplace interviewing will be emphasized. (This course may NOT be substituted for COMM 1010 - Speech) Semesters available: Day - S Evening - Offered based on need.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

ECON 1010 - Introduction to Economics

This course covers four topic areas: a) basic economic terms in microeconomics, b) basic economic terms in macroeconomics, c) a historical overview of major economic ideas and d) an exploration of a variety of economic issues. This course is recommended for students who desire a one term survey course in economics. In this course students shall be challenged to think critically and to formulate independent and well-considered conclusions about a variety of economic issues and policies at a personal level as well as at the national level. Upon completion of this course students shall be better equipped to rationally participate in current economic policy debates by understanding the historical evolution of economic system, institutions and ideologies. (OTM for Social and Behavioral Sciences TMSBS)

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

POLT 1010 - American National Government

This course involves an examination of the people, values, institutions, processes, and policies associated with American government. Special emphasis is given to the way in which all of the variables interact to form the dynamic that is American politics. This course meets the requirements for OTM in Social and Behavioral Science TMSBS

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

PSYC 1010 - Introduction to Psychology

Introduction to Psychology is an introductory level course and is a study of the basic human behavior. Topics include the history of psychology, scientific methods, biological processes, cognitive processes, sensation and perception, consciousness, learning, intelligence, human development, personality theory, psychopathology and treatment, stress and health, and social psychology. Please note outcomes are written to OBR standards using OBR language. Ohio Articulation Number OSS015. This course meets the requirements for OTM in Social and Behavioral Science TMSBS

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

PSYC 1070 - Introduction to Women's Studies

This course is an introductory course to familiarize learners with some of the major questions, themes, and issues in the study of women. This course will focus on the scientific study of female behavior, including personality, biological, psychological and cultural determinants of women's role in society. It will also discuss historical perspectives that have shaped and continue to shape women's lives as well as how women have resisted and continue to resist these very institutions, practices and representations. Topics discussed will include sexuality, gender development, sexism, women's multiple roles and relationships and violence against women. This course meets the requirements for OTM in Social and Behavioral Science TMSBS

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

PSYC 1090 - Death and Dying

This course will focus on why and how people experience loss, death and grief. We will investigate the ideas of Kubler-Ross and others and expand our exploration to include the Eastern and Judeo-Christian perspectives. In addition, we will consider a variety of sources of grief (death, divorce, alcoholism, birth of a handicapped child, life-threatening illnesses, etc.) and how people react to such events. Semesters available: Day - F Evening - Sp

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

PSYC 2050 - Abnormal Psychology

This course will examine the definition, classification, origin, and treatment of abnormal behavior. Categories of disorders discussed will include personality, anxiety, mood, somatoform, dissociative, sexual, psychotic, developmental- related and addictive disorders. Research methodology in abnormal psychology, historical perspective, the assessment process, ethical issues and use of the DSM will also be emphasized. Please note outcomes are written to OBR standards using OBR language. Ohio Articulation Number OSS017. This course meets the requirements for OTM in Social and Behavioral Science TMSBS

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Required Prerequisite Course: Take PSYC 1010;

SOCY 1010 - Introduction to Sociology

Introduction to the theoretical foundations and methods used to gather, interpret, and evaluate data in sociology. Insight into how society is organized by focusing on the structure and function of social institutions, the impact of culture and socialization on individuals and groups, and systems of stratification among various racial and ethnic, social class, gender and sexuality groups. Please note outcomes are written to OBR standards using OBR language. Ohio Articulation Number OSS021. This course meets the requirements for OTM in Social and Behavioral Science TMSBS.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

SOCY 2010 - Cultural Diversity and Racism

Sociological exploration of American racial and ethnic groups. Emphasis placed on the social construction of race and ethnicity, patterns of intergroup contact. Historical comparative analysis of selected groups with emphasis on economic, political and structural inequalities. Please note outcomes are written to OBR standards using OBR language. Ohio Articulation Number OSS 050 Race and Ethnicity . This course also meets the requirements for OTM in Social and Behavioral Sciences TMSBS.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

SOCY 2030 - Marriage and Family

Sociology of Marriage and Family examines numerous components that impact the family, including: marriage, love, work, race and ethnicity, parenthood, divorce, remarriage/stepfamilies, and family violence. Theoretical perspectives related to families will also be examined. Social and governmental influences that relate to and impact families will be addressed. TAG# OSS023

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3