Radiological Sciences, AAS

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The mission of the Radiological Sciences program is to produce competent entry‐level radiographers. Our graduates will demonstrate compassion and empathy toward patients, possess critical thinking and problem‐solving skills, and demonstrate professionalism.

A radiographer uses learned skills to produce images of the body using ionizing radiation. During the course of a day, a radiographer could be involved in general radiographic exams (hands, chest, feet, abdomen), trauma exams (car accidents, falls), or specialized exams (involving the use of contrast agents). Radiographers need to be adaptable, creative, and personable. There is a high degree of patient involvement. The radiographer needs to be courteous and outgoing to help patients through their exams. Employment opportunities exist in hospitals, clinics, private offices, or with mobile services.

The goal of the Radiological Sciences program is to provide a well‐balanced, educational and clinical experience. The program further provides the students with the theory and labs to augment their practical/clinical experience. During the five semester clinical sequence, students receive instruction in diagnostic imaging and are given short rotations in CT, MRI, Nuclear Medicine, Ultrasound and Radiation Oncology, Angiography and Heart Cauterization Lab. Some evenings are included as part of clinical education for additional trauma experience. Students also rotate, on a limited basis, to other clinical sites. Courses include Radiographic Procedures, Patient Care, Anatomy and Physiology, Radiation Biology, Radiographic Exposure, Pathology, Special Procedures, Digital Imaging, and Image Analysis.

The program is accredited by the Ohio Department of Health and The Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT, 20 North Wacker Drive, Suite 2850, Chicago, Illinois 60606‐2901, 312‐704‐5300). The JRCERT is recognized by the U.S. Department of Education as an accreditation agency and evaluates programs using standards endorsed by the American Society of Radiographic Technologists. North Central State College re-confirms the position of total support through human resources and fiscal measures towards the accreditation process.

The Radiological Sciences department publishes a student Policy and Procedure Manual which delineates specific department/program policies which are not explained in the general catalog. The specific policies as described in the department's student Policy and Procedure Manual take precedence over any general policy outlined in the College catalog. A copy of the Policy and Procedure Manual is available for review in the Admissions Office. An acceptable health physical and verification of immunizations/immunities are required. A Bureau of Criminal Identification and Investigation (BCI&I) report/FBI background check and drug screening are required in order to enter the clinical sequence.

The Radiological Sciences program contains a sequence of clinical and radiology classes that begin in the Fall Semester each year. Entrance into this program is limited to students who have successfully completed the entrance requirements and have been selected through the program's admission process. The entrance and admission policies can be found  at www.ncstatecollege.edu/cms/media/PDF/admissions‐procedures/RD-admin‐proc.pdf and copies are available in Room 201 of the Health Sciences Building and in the Admissions Office. Students may begin non‐RADS courses any semester. A minimum grade* of C+ (77%) is required in all non‐RADS courses (, , , , , HUMA elective,, ) and all RADS courses in order to meet prerequisite and graduation requirements.

The Associate of Applied Science degree is awarded for successful completion of the program.

Program Learning Outcomes

  1. Students will demonstrate clinical competency.
  2. Students will demonstrate critical thinking and problem solving skills.
  3. Students will demonstrate effective communication skills.
  4. Students will demonstrate professional attitude, behaviors and ethics.

Where You Could Go

Employment settings include hospitals, outpatient imaging centers, clinics, private offices, and mobile services.

NC State has over 40 agreements with four-year colleges and universities, to provide a smooth transition for students who want to pursue a bachelor’s degree. Through university partnerships, some four-year courses are also offered on the NC State campus or online.

National Certification

Our graduates have demonstrated a 99.3% first-time exam pass rate over the last 10 years.

Program Effectiveness Data:

Credentialing Examination - Pass on First Attempt (Benchmark 85%)

Year: 2015
% Passing on First Attempt: 100%
Number of First Time Examinees Passed/Taking the Test: 13/13
Year: 2016
% Passing on First Attempt: 100%
Number of First Time Examinees Passed/Taking the Test: 6/6
Year: 2017
% Passing on First Attempt: 100%
Number of First Time Examinees Passed/Taking the Test: 9/9
Year: 2018
% Passing on First Attempt: 60%
Number of First Time Examinees Passed/Taking the Test: 9/15
Year: 2019
% Passing on First Attempt: 94%
Number of First Time Examinees Passed/Taking the Test: 16/17 (1 graduate has not taken the exam)
Year: 5 year average
% Passing on First Attempt: 88%
Number of First Time Examinees Passed/Taking the Test: 53/60

Program Completion Rate: (Benchmark: 60%)

Year: 2015
% Completion: 76% (13/17)
Number of Students: 2 students withdrew but registered for a different program at the college; 3 students withdrew for personal reasons; 1 student returned to the program
Year: 2016
% Completion: 67% (6/9)
Number of Students: 1 student academically unsuccessful Fall 2014; 1 student withdrew for personal reasons Fall 2014; 1 student withdrew for personal reasons Spring 2015
Year: 2017
% Completion: 75% (9/12)
Number of Students: 1 student academically unsuccessful Fall 2015; 1 student withdrew for personal reasons after Fall 2015 semester; 1 student withdrew because he refused to get a flu vaccine
Year: 2018
% Completion: 60% (15/25)
Number of Students: 6 withdrew for personal reasons Fall 2016; 1 withdrew for personal reasons Spring 2017; 1 academically unsuccessful Fall 2016; 1 academically unsuccessful Spring 2017; 1 academically unsuccessful Fall 2017
Year: 2019
% Completion: 72% (18/25)
Number of Students: 4 withdrew for personal reasons during or after Fall 1, 2017; 1 withdrew for personal reasons after Spring 1, 2018; 1 academically unsuccessful Fall 2017; 1 academically unsuccessful Spring, 2019
Year: 5 year average
% Completion: 69% (61/88)

Job Placement: (Benchmark: 75% of graduates who actively seek employment are employed within 1 year of graduation*)

Year: 2015
% Job Placement: 85% (11/13)
Number of Students: 2/13 graduates did not return survey or email request for employment information
Year: 2016
% Job Placement: 100% (6/6)
Number of Students: 3/6 returned survey 3/6 per social media
Year: 2017
% Job Placement: 100% (9/9)
Number of Students: 6/9 in person; 3/9 per social media
Year: 2018
% Job Placement: 100% (11/11)
Number of Students: 7/11 in person; 4/11 per social media; 4 students have not passed the certification exam
Year: 2019
% Job Placement: 100% (17/17)
Number of Students: 14/17 in person; 3/17 per social media
Year: 5 year average
% Job Placement: 96% (54/56)
*“Not actively seeking employment” is defined as:
  1. Graduate fails to communicate with program officials regarding employment
    status after multiple attempts OR
  2. Graduate is unwilling to seek employment that requires relocation OR
  3. Graduate is unwilling to accept employment due to salary or hours OR
  4. Graduate is on active military duty AND/OR
  5. Graduate is continuing education.

For more information regarding program effectiveness data, visit the JRCERT website at
www.jrcert.org

Year One

Fall Semester

BIOL 2751 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I

This course is an in-depth study of the principles of human anatomy and physiology. It includes the study of structure and function of the body as a whole and study of cell biology, histology, the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, endocrine, and nervous systems plus the special senses. Laboratory exercises are designed to supplement lecture topics and include microscopy, the study of models, cat and specimen dissection, cadaver study, and physiological experiments. (OTM approved course in Natural Sciences TMNS)

Credit Hours: 4
Lecture Hours: 3
Required Prerequisite Course: High school chemistry with minimum C minus (C-) grade or CHEM 1010 with minimum C minus (C-) grade; AND ENGL 0040, MATH 0084 (Minimum grade of C- for all); OR qualifying placement test score. If the student has completed BIO121 and BIO122 OR BIOL 1730 with a minimum grade of C, then the student is not required to have high school Chemistry or
Required Concurrent Course: Take BIOL 2751L

HLTH 1150 - Medical Terminology

This course will introduce medical terminology; including common medical root words, prefixes, suffixes, and combining forms. It will include common medical abbreviations, pronunciation, spelling, and definitions of medical terminology related to the human body systems. Students who are pursuing an allied health or nursing degree, or working in health care professions will enhance their knowledge of medical terminology in this course. (TAG# OHL020 and CTAG# CTMT001)

Credit Hours: 2
Lecture Hours: 2

RADS 1120 - Clinical Practicum I

Clinical Practicum is designed to provide students with practical application of material learned in didactic courses. Following a clinical orientation, students will be assigned to an affiliated clinical facility. An orientation to patient transport and to the radiology desk for order entry will be assigned. The students will learn to manipulate the radiographic equipment and perform radiographic procedures under the appropriate level of supervision of qualified radiographers. Students complete clinical objectives and competencies.

Credit Hours: 1
Practicum Hours: 7
Required Concurrent Course: Take RADS 1160

RADS 1140 - Radiologic Procedures/Seminar I

This course will provide an introduction to the basic steps in completion of a radiographic examination from the beginning of the procedure to the end of the procedure. Radiographic procedures of the chest, abdomen, and appendicular skeleton will be presented. Mobile X-ray procedures and surgical X-ray procedures will be introduced. The students will develop an understanding of how to use age-appropriate communication in the clinical setting. Laboratory exercises in an energized lab provide the student with practical application of the classroom material. Radiation protection is emphasized. Medical terminology is correlated with the content of the course. Radiographic images will be evaluated. A one hour seminar will cover various clinical topics.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 1
Seminar Hours: 1
Required Concurrent Course: Take RADS 1120, RADS 1140L

RADS 1160 - Imaging Science 1

This course is designed to provide an overview of the radiographer's role in the healthcare delivery system. The course introduces concepts related to the profession, patient care assessments, radiation protection, basic radiographic equipment and image analysis standards. The lab setting will permit application of these skills.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 2
Required Concurrent Course: Take RADS 1120 RADS 1140, RADS 1160L

STAT 1010 - Probability and Statistics

This course provides the student with an overview of probability and statistics. Probability terminology, concepts and rules are emphasized in solving probability problems. Descriptive statistics, including measures of central tendency and dispersion, charts, tables and diagrams are used to summarize data. The student is introduced to the binomial, Poisson, hyper-geometric, normal and t-distributions. Confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation, and linear regression are used to make conclusions concerning population parameters from sample data. This course meets the requirements for OTM Introductory Statistics TMM010.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

Spring Semester

BIOL 2752 - Anatomy and Physiology II

This course is a continuation of BIOL 2751. It includes the study of structure and function of blood and the cardiovascular, lymphatic/immunity, digestive, respiratory, urinary, and reproductive systems. Laboratory exercises are designed to supplement lecture topics and include microscopy, the study of models, cat and specimen dissection, cadaver study, and physiological experiments. (OTM approved course in Natural Sciences TMNS)

Credit Hours: 4
Lecture Hours: 3
Required Prerequisite Course: Take BIOL 2751; Minimum Grade C-
Required Concurrent Course: Take BIOL 2752L

ENGL 1010 - English Composition I

This is a basic course in expository writing and critical reading. Students read a variety of nonfiction works and write summaries, analysis, essays, and a researched argument in response to their reading. Students learn to read actively and accurately and to organize, develop, and revise coherent papers appropriate for a college-educated audience. (OTM for First Writing Course TME001)

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Required Prerequisite Course: ENGL 0040; (minimum grade of C-), or qualifying placement test scores

HLTH 1010 - Legal & Ethical Aspects of Health Care

This course introduces concepts of ethics and along with the structure and function of the American legal system. Students will explore a variety of legal and ethical issues that arise in health care settings. Emphasis is placed on providing quality patient care, reducing liability risks and maintaining confidentiality of patient information. The course meets the outcomes required for OHL021- Legal Aspects (Healthcare Privacy, Confidentiality, Legal and Ethical Issues) and the requirements for CTHIM002.

Credit Hours: 2
Lecture Hours: 2

RADS 1220 - Clinical Practicum 2

Clinical Practicum is designed to provide students with practical application of material learned in didactic courses. In this course students will continue to perform radiographic procedures under the appropriate level of supervision of qualified radiographers. Student will rotate to mobile radiography and surgical radiography. Clinical rotations to facilities may vary this semester as students rotate to facilities with digital imaging systems and computed imaging systems to help learn the comparisons of both types of systems encountered in the field. Students complete clinical objectives and competencies.

Credit Hours: 1
Practicum Hours: 7
Required Prerequisite Course: Take RADS 1160
Required Concurrent Course: Take RADS 1260

RADS 1240 - Radiologic Procedures/Sem 2

Radiographic procedures of the pelvic girdle, shoulder girdle, bony thorax and spine will be presented. Laboratory exercises in an energized lab provide the student with practical application of the classroom material. Radiation protection is emphasized. There will be a continuation of instruction on mobile radiographic procedures. Special imaging procedures of the joints (Arthrography) and of the spine (Myelography) will be introduced. The students will be given an overview of the basic concepts and terminology related to the study of radiographic pathology. Radiographic pathology of the skeletal system will be presented. Students will correlate knowledge of skeletal pathology and radiographic positioning with the evaluation of medical images. Medical terminology is correlated with the content of the course. A one hour seminar will cover various clinical topics.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 1
Lab Hours: 3
Seminar Hours: 1
Required Prerequisite Course: Take HLTH 1150, RADS 1120
Required Concurrent Course: Take RADS 1220, RADS 1240L

RADS 1260 - Imaging Science 2

This course is designed to establish a foundation in the principles that govern the image production process. Content establishes a knowledge base of factors that control and influence the production and recording of radiographic images. Electronic and film imaging with associated accessories are included. Image analysis is included with the importance of optimal imaging standards. The lab setting will permit application of these skills. Semesters Available: Day - F

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 2
Required Prerequisite Course: Take RADS 1140
Required Concurrent Course: Take RADS 1240, RADS 1260L

Summer Semester

ENGL 1030 - English Composition II

This is a course in argument and research writing. Students read issue-based works and write summaries, responses, and an argument and research paper. Students learn to organize research projects, find and evaluate sources, incorporate ideas and quotations from sources, document their sources in MLA and APA style, analyze and use argumentative strategies and persuasive appeals, and prepare and revise effective, coherent papers. (OTM for Second Writing Course TME002)

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Required Prerequisite Course: Take ENGL 1010 with a minimum grade of C- or better.

RADS 2321 - Clinical Practicum 3

Clinical Practicum is designed to provide students with practical application of material learned in didactic courses. In this course students will continue to perform radiographic procedures under the appropriate level of supervision of qualified radiographers. Students will learn how to operate fluoroscopy equipment and perform contrasted exams of the GI tract. Student will continue rotations through mobile and surgical radiography. Students will begin orthopedic rotations to learn various modifications of radiographic positioning and procedures. Students complete clinical objectives and competencies

Credit Hours: 1
Practicum Hours: 7
Required Prerequisite Course: Take RADS 1260
Required Concurrent Course: Take RADS 2360, RADS 2340

RADS 2340 - Radiologic Procedures/Seminar 3

Radiographic procedures of the neck, digestive and biliary systems will be presented. Students will learn to work with barium sulfate, gastrografin, and carbon dioxide as contrast medium for the digestive system. Laboratory exercises in an energized lab provide the student with practical application of the classroom material. Radiation protection is emphasized. Radiographic pathology of the digestive and hepatobiliary systems will be presented. Students will learn to recognize pathology of the digestive and hepatobiliary system on medical images and be able to identify imaging procedures appropriate for each body system. A one hour seminar will cover various clinical topics.

Credit Hours: 1
Required Prerequisite Course: Take RADS 1220
Required Concurrent Course: Take RADS 2321, RADS 2360, RADS 2340L

RADS 2360 - Imaging Science 3

This course provides basic concepts of pharmacology, EKG, venipuncture and administration of diagnostic contrast agents and intravenous medications. The appropriate delivery of patient care during these procedures is emphasized. Students also continue to evaluate radiographic images for diagnostic efficacy. Semesters Available: Day - Su

Credit Hours: 1
Required Prerequisite Course: Take BIOL 2752, RADS 1240
Required Concurrent Course: Take RADS 2340, RADS 2360L

Year Two

Fall Semester

COMM 1010 - Speech

This course involves instruction and experience in giving a presentation. Students are taught the principles of speech content and delivery so that they can effectively participate in a variety of practical speaking situations. Presentations will include the informative speech, persuasive speech, visual aid/demonstration speech, impromptu speech, and group presentation. (OTM for Oral Communication TMCOM and TAG# OCM013)

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

RADS 2420 - Clincal Practicum 4

Clinical Practicum is designed to provide students with practical application of material learned in didactic courses. In this course students will continue to perform radiographic procedures under the appropriate level of supervision of qualified radiographers. Introductory clinical rotations will be schedule in the modalities of CT and MRI to help students gain an understanding of cross-sectional anatomy and the role these special imaging modalities play in the diagnosis of diseases. Student will rotate to a pediatric hospital to gain experience imaging pediatric patients. Students complete clinical objectives and competencies.

Credit Hours: 2
Practicum Hours: 14
Required Prerequisite Course: Take RADS 2360
Required Concurrent Course: Take RADS 2460

RADS 2440 - Radiologic Procedures/Seminar 4

Radiographic procedures of the skull, sinuses and facial bones will be introduced. Methods for imaging pediatric patients will be explored. Students will learn to modify positioning protocols for trauma patients and recognize trauma pathology on radiographs. Laboratory exercises in an energized lab provide the student with practical application of the classroom material. Radiation protection is emphasized. Medical terminology is correlated with the content of the course. Radiographic pathology of the respiratory, cardiovascular and central nervous system will be included. A one-hour seminar will cover various clinical topics.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 1
Seminar Hours: 1
Required Prerequisite Course: Take RADS 2321
Required Concurrent Course: Take RADS 2420, RADS 2440L, RADS 2460.

RADS 2460 - Imaging Science 4

This course is designed to establish a knowledge base of radiographic and fluoroscopic equipment design. The nature and characteristics of radiation, x-ray production, and photon interaction with matter are also included. Image analysis is included with the importance of optimal imaging standards. The lab setting will permit application of these skills. Semesters Available: Day - F

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 2
Required Prerequisite Course: Take RADS 2340
Required Concurrent Course: RADS 2440, RADS 2460L

SOCY 1010 - Introduction to Sociology

Introduction to the theoretical foundations and methods used to gather, interpret, and evaluate data in sociology. Insight into how society is organized by focusing on the structure and function of social institutions, the impact of culture and socialization on individuals and groups, and systems of stratification among various racial and ethnic, social class, gender and sexuality groups. Please note outcomes are written to OBR standards using OBR language. Ohio Articulation Number OSS021. This course meets the requirements for OTM in Social and Behavioral Science TMSBS.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

Spring Semester

RADS 2520 - Clinical Practicum 5

Clinical Practicum is designed to provide students with practical application of material learned in didactic courses. In this course students will continue to perform radiographic procedures under the appropriate level of supervision of qualified radiographers. Students will be completing all required mandatory and elective competencies and objectives prior to completion of the program. In addition, students will be gathering medical images and reports (following HIPAA requirements) to complete their capstone case study. Introductory clinical rotations will be scheduled in the modalities of angiography, cardiac catheterization lab, echocardiography, EKG, ultrasound and radiation therapy to help students gain an understanding of the role these special imaging modalities play in the diagnosis of diseases.

Credit Hours: 3
Practicum Hours: 21
Required Prerequisite Course: Take RADS 2460
Required Concurrent Course: Take RADS 2560

RADS 2540 - Radiologic Procedures/Seminar 5

This course is a capstone to all previous radiographic procedure courses. Students will be creating a radiographic case study and presenting the case to their peers. In addition, students will be required to complete final lab simulations to assess entry-level positioning skills. Some new information will continue to be presented such as radiographic procedures of the urinary and reproductive system. Pathology of the urinary and reproductive system will also be included to help students correlate the use of specific radiographic projections and their influence on the diagnosis of diseases. Laboratory exercises in an energized lab provide the student with practical application of the classroom material. Radiation biology will be discussed and its influence on radiation protection protocols. Students will complete a Web-based research assignment investigating the impact of radiation accidents and their effect on human organisms. Medical terminology is correlated with the content of the course. American Registry of Radiologic Technologies (ARRT) certification exam review will be conducted. A one-hour seminar will include various clinical topics.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 1
Seminar Hours: 1
Required Prerequisite Course: Take RADS 2420
Required Concurrent Course: Take RADS 2520, RADS 2540L. RADS 2560.

RADS 2560 - Imaging Science 5

This course is designed to incorporate learned radiologic concepts and clinical practices. Focus areas in radiology will be reviewed in preparation for graduation. This course includes evaluations for final competencies in clinical and didactic studies. The course will also present information in resume writing, interview techniques, professional development including certification and licensure requirements, ethical /legal responsibilities and transition from student to radiographer. The lab setting will permit application of these skills.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 2
Required Prerequisite Course: Take RADS 2440
Required Concurrent Course: Take RADS 2540, RADS 2560L

Total Credit Hours: 65

Humanities Electives

Courses

HIST 1010 - American History I

This American Studies course is an introductory survey course covering the development of American politics, law, religion, philosophy, art and literature from 1600 to 1877. The goal of the course is to help students understand the cultural development of the United States especially in relation to its religion, art, philosophy, law, and political system. (TAG# OHS043 or if combined with HIST1030 OHS010. This course also meets the requirements for the OTM Arts and Humanities - TMAH)

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

HIST 1030 - American History II

This American Studies course is an introductory survey course covering the development of American politics, law, religion, philosophy, art and literature from 1877 to the present. The goal of the course is to help students understand the cultural maturity of the United States especially in relation to its religion, art, philosophy, law, and political system. (TAG# OHS044 or if combined with HIST1030 OHS010. This course also meets the requirements for the OTM Arts and Humanities - TMAH)

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

HIST 1050 - Western Civilization I

This course presents an overview of European civilization from antiquity to about the year 1600, stressing the chief political, social, cultural, and religious developments within this span of time. This class will help students gain a better understanding of the historical narrative of European civilization, particularly as it relates to political institutions and structures and social and cultural developments; develop improved textual interpretation skills through the careful reading and discussion of ancient and medieval texts; and refine their ability to express ideas and produce convincing arguments through writing essays and short paper.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

HIST 1070 - Western Civilization II

This course presents an overview of European civilization from around 1500 to the present, stressing the chief political, social, cultural, and religious developments within this span of time. This class will help students gain a better knowledge of the historical narrative of European civilization, particularly as it relates to political institutions and structures and social and cultural developments; develop improved textual interpretation skills through the careful reading and discussion of historical texts; and refine their ability to express ideas and produce convincing arguments through writing essays and a short paper.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

HUMA 1010 - Introduction to the Humanities

This course is a genre-based introduction to the humanities and the fine arts. The student will explore the six major means of artistic expression within the fine arts: painting, literature, drama, film, photography, and sculpture. The course focuses on an understanding of the genre itself as well as the various critical theories that apply to the fine arts, including but not necessarily limited to mimesis, formalism, didacticism, and postmodernism. Field trips are required in the course. This course meets the requirements for OTM in Arts and Humanities TMAH.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Required Prerequisite Course: ENGL 0040 (minimum grade of C-); OR qualifying placement test score

HUMA 1030 - Leadership and the Classics

This course is designed to provide learners with a fundamental awareness of leadership qualities and to help identify their personal leadership philosophies. The course is an interdisciplinary study that explores the relationships that exist among philosophy, history, meta-history, literature, drama, film, and visual art as they reveal examples of and standards for leadership. Semesters available: Day - F Evening - Offered based on need.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

MUSC 1010 - Music Appreciation

Develop listening skills used for understanding elements of musical style in a historical perspective and the significance of music as fine art.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

PHIL 1010 - Western Philosophy

This course involves an examination of the great philosophical ideas that have shaped the development of Western Civilization. These ideas include those promoted during the ancient Greek period of Western development, the early Christian era, the Protestant Reformation, the Enlightenment, the Nineteenth Century, the Modern Age, the Age of Existentialism, the Postmodern era, and the Age of Recovery. The philosophers covered include Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, St. Paul, Augustine, Occam, Aquinas, Erasmus, Luther, Descartes, Hobbes, Rousseau, Kant, Hegel, Feuerbach, Marx, Emerson, Nietzsche, Kierkegaard, Bergson, Dewey, Heidegger, Sartre, Camus, Teilhard, Habermas, Pera, Guardini, Zizek, and Ratzinger. This course meets the requirements for OTM Arts and Humanities TMAH and also TAG# OAH405.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

PHIL 1110 - Ethics

This course involves an examination of several ethical theories, including ethical relativism, utilitarianism, virtue ethics, social contract ethics, theological ethics, and rational ethics. Subjects covered may include the ethics of nuclear war, the ethics of suicide, ethical issues in abortion, the ethics of euthanasia, ethical issues in genetic engineering, sexual ethics, racism and sexism, capital punishment, ethics and the environment and so on. This course meets the requirements for OTM Arts and Humanities TMAH and slso TAG# OAH046.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

THEA 1010 - Introduction to Theatre

Course is an overview of theatre as an art form. Includes historical and production points of view. Students will effectively view and critique plays and musicals. This is NOT a performance based course, but a theory and analysis based class. Semesters Available: Offered based on need.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3