Human and Social Work Services, AAS

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The Associate degree human service professional is recognized as an important member of a team of professionals working to assist persons with a variety of disabilities or problems. Employment opportunities exist in various settings in both public and private sectors. Specific roles vary from agency to agency and are as broad as human needs are.

The successful student will be a caring individual who will acquire the skills necessary to provide services or opportunities to a variety of persons in many different situations. Work settings include: mental health centers, developmental disability agencies, drug and alcohol programs, public schools, domestic violence shelters, juvenile and adult correction facilities, nursing homes, social welfare agencies, and the like.

In addition to the technical courses in this program, the student will have opportunities to learn and apply the learned skills in actual situations through two scheduled practicums and a directed practice for a total of 578 hours of hands‐on experiences. Graduates of the Human Services program qualify to apply to the Ohio Social Worker, Marriage and Family Therapists Board to become Social Worker Assistants.

An acceptable Bureau of Criminal Identification and Investigation (BCI&I) report is required in order to begin the practicum sequence. Various practicum sites have specific background check requirements. Individuals with a felony and/or domestic violence conviction may not be permitted to complete practicum experiences at some specific sites. There is no waiting list to enter into the program and enrollment is not limited to a particular number of students.

The Human Services Department publishes a student handbook which delineates specific department/program policies that are not explained in the general catalog. The specific policies as described in the department's student handbook take precedence over any general policy outlined in the College catalog. A copy of the handbook is available for review in the Admissions Office. A minimum grade of C‐ is required in all courses in order to receive a certificate of registration to practice as a Social Work Assistant. The Associate of Applied Science degree is awarded for the completion of this program.

Program Learning Outcomes

  1. Graduates of the program will be proficient in the helping process at the micro, mezzo and macro levels with Human Services.
  2. Graduates will demonstrate professional attitudes, behaviors and ethics.
  3. Graduates will have effective written, verbal and nonverbal communication skills.

Where You Could Go

Graduates with an Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degree may apply to become a Social Work Assistant (SWA) through the Ohio Counselor, Social Worker, Marriage and Family Therapist Board. Students who complete NC State’s Associate of Arts (AA) degree in Social Work or  the Associate of Applied Science (AAS) in Human and Social Work Services degree can go on to a four-year program. After earning a bachelor’s degree and passing the licensure exam, they can become a Licensed Social Worker. Students in the AA and AAS program will also be eligible to apply for the Chemical Dependency Counseling Assistant (CDCA) certification through the Ohio Chemical Dependency Professionals Board.

NC State has agreements with four-year colleges and universities in central Ohio and around the state to provide a smooth transition for students who want to pursue a bachelor’s degree. Through university partnerships, some four-year university courses are also offered on the NC State campus or online.

Job Demand

Many career choices are available for human and social work services graduates. The field is stable and offers good job security, along with advancement opportunities with further training and continued education.

What You Will Learn

Human and Social Work Services students develop strong technical skills to assist individuals and groups in a variety of settings—becoming familiar with social problems, client assessments, case management, treatment modalities, and more. Students also build a strong foundation in biology, communication, psychology, statistics, and humanities.

Degree and Certificate Options

  • For students who want to work immediately after earning an associate degree and who may also want to continue their education toward a bachelor’s/master’s degree. [link to page listing courses with course descriptions and syllabi]

  • For students who want to transfer after earning an associate degree to continue their education toward a bachelor’s/master’s degree
    [link to page listing courses with course descriptions]

  • For students who want to apply for the CDCA certification and work in jobs providing services to individuals and families impacted by substance abuse disorders. This certificate may be completed as part of the AAS in Human and Social Work Services.
    [link to page listing courses with course descriptions]

Year One

Fall Semester

ENGL 1010 - English Composition I

This is a basic course in expository writing and critical reading. Students read a variety of nonfiction works and write summaries, analysis, essays, and a researched argument in response to their reading. Students learn to read actively and accurately and to organize, develop, and revise coherent papers appropriate for a college-educated audience. (OTM for First Writing Course TME001)

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Required Prerequisite Course: ENGL 0040; (minimum grade of C-), or qualifying placement test scores

HMSV 1020 - Introduction to Social Work Services

This course introduces the learner to the field of social work with emphasis on the "person-in-environment" and attention to a range of practice approaches to understanding and assisting of the human condition. This course is an overview of the history, values, and ethics of the profession as well as various fields of practice in which social workers are employed. TAG# OSS029

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

HMSV 1030 - Human Services Assessments

This course provides an overview of the various types of assessing completed in Human Services work. This course presents principles, types, phases, and the recording of interviews used with various types of clients including the Intake and Psychosocial Interview. In addition, various forms of assessments and documentation will be explored.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 2

PSYC 1010 - Introduction to Psychology

Introduction to Psychology is an introductory level course and is a study of the basic human behavior. Topics include the history of psychology, scientific methods, biological processes, cognitive processes, sensation and perception, consciousness, learning, intelligence, human development, personality theory, psychopathology and treatment, stress and health, and social psychology. Please note outcomes are written to OBR standards using OBR language. Ohio Articulation Number OSS015. This course meets the requirements for OTM in Social and Behavioral Science TMSBS

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

STAT 1010 - Probability and Statistics

This course provides the student with an overview of probability and statistics. Probability terminology, concepts and rules are emphasized in solving probability problems. Descriptive statistics, including measures of central tendency and dispersion, charts, tables and diagrams are used to summarize data. The student is introduced to the binomial, Poisson, hyper-geometric, normal and t-distributions. Confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation, and linear regression are used to make conclusions concerning population parameters from sample data. This course meets the requirements for OTM Introductory Statistics TMM010.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

Spring Semester

ENGL 1030 - English Composition II

This is a course in argument and research writing. Students read issue-based works and write summaries, responses, and an argument and research paper. Students learn to organize research projects, find and evaluate sources, incorporate ideas and quotations from sources, document their sources in MLA and APA style, analyze and use argumentative strategies and persuasive appeals, and prepare and revise effective, coherent papers. (OTM for Second Writing Course TME002)

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Required Prerequisite Course: Take ENGL 1010 with a minimum grade of C- or better.

HMSV 1090 - Group Work in Human Services

This course places importance on understanding how groups work effectively and ineffectively and in understanding how groups can be used as a change or growth opportunity. Not only is the focus on group process, but the students' ability to increase their interpersonal effectiveness while working with human services clients.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 2
Lab Hours: 2
Required Prerequisite Course: Take HMSV 1030

HMSV 1150 - Introduction to Chemical Dependency

This course provides an introduction into the field of chemical dependency counseling. This course meets all requirements necessary to apply for the Chemical Dependency Counselor Assistant (CDCA) phase I. This course looks at the essentials of chemical dependency counseling, including the characteristic of a counselor, ethic and legal issues, the process of becoming a counselor, theories of addiction, counseling procedures and strategies, group work, assessment and diagnosis, and treatment planning.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

HMSV 1170 - Directed Practice/Seminar

This course will introduce the student to the components of professionalism and the challenges facing those who are in the profession of Human and Social WorksServices. This course also provides a practicum orientation to prepare students for the Human Services Program. Students will also complete seventy five (75) hours of directed practice.

Credit Hours: 3
Directed Practice Hours: 3
Required Prerequisite Course: Take HMSV 1020 HMSV 1030;

PSYC 2010 - Human Growth and Development

This course presents an overview of the total life span of human growth and development from conception through old age. It begins with a study of the major theories of human development and includes an examination of the dynamics of human growth in five areas: physical, intellectual, personality, social and moral. The developmental tasks and behavioral characteristics of eight stages of human growth are examined, ending with a brief treatment of death and dying. Please note outcomes are written to OBR standards using OBR language. Ohio Articulation Number OSS048. This course meets the requirements for OTM in Social and Behavioral Science TMSBS

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Required Prerequisite Course: Take PSYC 1010

Year Two

Fall Semester

HMSV 2030 - Introduction to Case Management

This course introduces the basic theory and practice of Case Management. It outlines case management as it specifically relates to the fields of developmental disabilities, mental health, and vocational rehabilitation. Topics covered include the roles and functions of a case manager; skills needed to effectively administer and service caseload activity; utilization of community services, and the maintenance of a client-centered approach to case management.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Required Prerequisite Course: Take HMSV 1020, HMSV 1170;

HMSV 2050 - Social Problems

This course will present an overview of generally recognized social problems by sociological measurement. Definitions of social problems and an understanding of their impact on the quality of life and the social work field will be implemented.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Required Prerequisite Course: Take HMSV 1020, HMSV 1170

HMSV 2070 - Practicum/Seminar II

This course provides students with hands-on experience within the Human and Social Work Services field. This course involves placement of the student into an actual work environment. The student will complete 240 hours of work experience at the placement site. This experience provides the foundation for developing the student into a competent human services worker. In addition, the course provides opportunities for students to further develop their skills and to share their knowledge and viewpoints through a presentation, leadership, and report writing format.

Credit Hours: 4
Lecture Hours: 2
Practicum Hours: 14
Required Prerequisite Course: Take HMSV 1020 HMSV 1090 HMSV 1170;

BIOL 1050 - Principles of Biology

This course is designed as an introduction to biology for non-majors. The course will provide the fundamentals of biology for students as an introduction to further college biology courses. The course will introduce students to the diversity, structure, and interdependence of living organisms with one another and the environment. Students will meet two lecture hours and two lab hours per week.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 2
Required Concurrent Course: Take BIOL 1050L

BIOL 1230 - Biology I

This course is an introduction to biology for bioscience majors and students planning to transfer to four year institutions. The course will introduce fundamental concepts of biology including the scientific method, structure and chemical properties of cells. The course will introduce students to biochemical pathways, bioenergetics, and basic concepts of genetics, heredity and homeostasis. Historical contributions and application of biological principles to biotechnology will be discussed. Students will meet three lecture hours and three lab hours per week. Semesters available: Day - F

Credit Hours: 4
Lecture Hours: 3
Lab Hours: 3
Required Prerequisite Course: Take ENGL 0040 and MATH 0084 (minimum grade of C- required for all) OR qualifying placement test scores.

Spring Semester

HMSV 2090 - Treatment Modalities/Crisis Intervention

This course provides an overview of the typical maturational and situational crises confronting the human service worker. Special emphasis on characteristics and dynamics of a crisis, the assessment process, intervention strategies, the referral process, and available community resources and services for the client in crisis.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Required Prerequisite Course: Take HMSV 2030, HMSV 2050, HMSV 2070;

HMSV 2110 - Poverty and Social Welfare

Poverty and Social Welfare is a course providing students with an understanding of the relationship between poverty, discrimination, and economics. Students will gain a perspective of the institutional forces that impact the vulnerable populations of society. Student will learn the history behind the development of social welfare and social services in United States, as well as understand how social welfare policies affect the delivery of social services from a state and federal level. Student will show development in the areas of social services ideologies, values, and ethics. TAG # OSS030

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Required Prerequisite Course: Take ENGL 1030.

HMSV 2270 - Practicum/Seminar III

This course is designed to provide the student with hands-on experience within the Human and Social Work Services field. This course involves placement of the student in an actual work environment. This work experience provides the student with the foundation to be a competent worker within the Human and Social Work Services field. The student will complete a minimum of 210 physical hours at an approved site. The student will also attend a weekly seminar providing an opportunity to share their experiences and learned skills with others.

Credit Hours: 4
Lecture Hours: 2
Practicum Hours: 21
Required Prerequisite Course: Take HMSV 2030 HMSV 2050 HMSV 2070;

Total Credit Hours: 62-63

Basic Electives

Courses

CRMJ 1070 - Family Violence

This course examines the characteristics of the growing number of families "on the fault line" of present day society in the United States. The causes and solutions that have been proposed to understand, control, and re-address problems of at-risk families are discussed during this course. Topics of discussion include the characteristics of social intervention, domestic violence, sexual violence, child abuse, exploitation and neglect, crimes against the elderly, and victim rights/issues. This course further examines the professional and criminal justice response to these issues.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

CRMJ 1090 - Juvenile Delinquency

This course provides an overview of the current theoretical and methodological issues concerning juvenile delinquency. This course examines the nature, extent, and causes of juvenile delinquency. The course is structured to focus on the social construction of delinquency, the development of the juvenile justice system, theoretical explanations of delinquency, and the current research on juvenile delinquency in the United States. The primary objectives of this course are to foster critical thinking about how we define, address, research, punish, and treat delinquency in America.

Credit Hours: 4
Lecture Hours: 4

HMSV 1190 - Death and Dying

Course Description:  This course will focus on why and how people experience loss, death and grief.  We will investigate the ideas of Kubler-Ross and others and expand our exploration to include the Eastern and Judeo-Christian perspectives.  In addition, we will consider a variety of sources of grief (death, divorce, alcoholism, birth of a handicapped child, life-threatening illnesses, etc.) and how people react to such events

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Required Prerequisite Course: none
Required Concurrent Course: none

HMSV 2120 - Human Disabilities

This course will explore causes of disability and behavioral health issues, characteristics, economic implications, social and emotional impact on the individual. How society deals with difference and the impact on society will also be explored.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

HMSV 2150 - Substance Abuse & Treatment

This course examines the biological, psychological, and societal forces that encourage the use, misuse, abuse and addiction to drugs. Specific drug classifications and the effect of these drugs on the individual will be explored. Theories and models of addition and treatment will be explored as will DSM5 criteria. Assessments used in the field will be introduced. The need for generalist training in the field of Human Services will be emphasized.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Required Prerequisite Course: Take HMSV 1150

HMSV 2160 - Substance Abuse Counseling: Core Functions

This course will demonstrate the base of knowledge and skills necessary for addictions counseling. Students will develop and demonstrate knowledge of the 12 core functions of a substance abuse counselor. It will prepare students for further education in the specialized field of addictions counseling.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Required Prerequisite Course: Take HMSV 2150

PSYC 2050 - Abnormal Psychology

This course will examine the definition, classification, origin, and treatment of abnormal behavior. Categories of disorders discussed will include personality, anxiety, mood, somatoform, dissociative, sexual, psychotic, developmental- related and addictive disorders. Research methodology in abnormal psychology, historical perspective, the assessment process, ethical issues and use of the DSM will also be emphasized. Please note outcomes are written to OBR standards using OBR language. Ohio Articulation Number OSS017. This course meets the requirements for OTM in Social and Behavioral Science TMSBS

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Required Prerequisite Course: Take PSYC 1010;

SOCY 1010 - Introduction to Sociology

Introduction to the theoretical foundations and methods used to gather, interpret, and evaluate data in sociology. Insight into how society is organized by focusing on the structure and function of social institutions, the impact of culture and socialization on individuals and groups, and systems of stratification among various racial and ethnic, social class, gender and sexuality groups. Please note outcomes are written to OBR standards using OBR language. Ohio Articulation Number OSS021. This course meets the requirements for OTM in Social and Behavioral Science TMSBS.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

SOCY 2010 - Cultural Diversity and Racism

Sociological exploration of American racial and ethnic groups. Emphasis placed on the social construction of race and ethnicity, patterns of intergroup contact. Historical comparative analysis of selected groups with emphasis on economic, political and structural inequalities. Please note outcomes are written to OBR standards using OBR language. Ohio Articulation Number OSS 050 Race and Ethnicity . This course also meets the requirements for OTM in Social and Behavioral Sciences TMSBS.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

Humanities Electives

Courses

HIST 1010 - American History I

This American Studies course is an introductory survey course covering the development of American politics, law, religion, philosophy, art and literature from 1600 to 1877. The goal of the course is to help students understand the cultural development of the United States especially in relation to its religion, art, philosophy, law, and political system. (TAG# OHS043 or if combined with HIST1030 OHS010. This course also meets the requirements for the OTM Arts and Humanities - TMAH)

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

HIST 1030 - American History II

This American Studies course is an introductory survey course covering the development of American politics, law, religion, philosophy, art and literature from 1877 to the present. The goal of the course is to help students understand the cultural maturity of the United States especially in relation to its religion, art, philosophy, law, and political system. (TAG# OHS044 or if combined with HIST1030 OHS010. This course also meets the requirements for the OTM Arts and Humanities - TMAH)

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

PHIL 1010 - Western Philosophy

This course involves an examination of the great philosophical ideas that have shaped the development of Western Civilization. These ideas include those promoted during the ancient Greek period of Western development, the early Christian era, the Protestant Reformation, the Enlightenment, the Nineteenth Century, the Modern Age, the Age of Existentialism, the Postmodern era, and the Age of Recovery. The philosophers covered include Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, St. Paul, Augustine, Occam, Aquinas, Erasmus, Luther, Descartes, Hobbes, Rousseau, Kant, Hegel, Feuerbach, Marx, Emerson, Nietzsche, Kierkegaard, Bergson, Dewey, Heidegger, Sartre, Camus, Teilhard, Habermas, Pera, Guardini, Zizek, and Ratzinger. This course meets the requirements for OTM Arts and Humanities TMAH and also TAG# OAH405.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

PHIL 1110 - Ethics

This course involves an examination of several ethical theories, including ethical relativism, utilitarianism, virtue ethics, social contract ethics, theological ethics, and rational ethics. Subjects covered may include the ethics of nuclear war, the ethics of suicide, ethical issues in abortion, the ethics of euthanasia, ethical issues in genetic engineering, sexual ethics, racism and sexism, capital punishment, ethics and the environment and so on. This course meets the requirements for OTM Arts and Humanities TMAH and slso TAG# OAH046.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3