Occupational Therapy Assistant, AAS

Occupational Therapy is a well‐recognized health profession that assists people of all ages to gain the skills needed to complete meaningful daily activities known as occupations, such as eating, dressing, completing homecare, working, playing, and participating in school, leisure or social activities. When an individual's life is disrupted because of a developmental or learning disability, a physical injury or illness, aging and/or social and psychological challenges, an occupational therapy professional may help by teaching new skills, adapting or resolving barriers to independent functioning.

An occupational therapy assistant works under the supervision of an occupational therapist to assist in the evaluation process and they may collaborate with the occupational therapist and other health care professionals such as doctors, nurses, physical therapy professionals and social workers to develop a treatment plan. The occupational therapy assistant then implements the treatment plan as outlined by the occupational therapist.

The Occupational Therapy Assistant program is part of the Health Science Division with limited yearly enrollment. Applications must be completed by January of each year for admission to the program for the following Fall semester. You must contact the office of Health Science to schedule and attend an OTA program selection information session (OTAPSIS). Students may begin non‐OTAP courses any semester. Students in the Occupational Therapy Assistant program must maintain a 2.0 cumulative grade point average while in the OTAP program. A minimum grade of 77% is required in , , , , , , and all OTAP courses in order to meet prerequisite requirements.

The NCSC Occupational Therapy Assistant program is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA), located at 4720 Montgomery Lane, Bethesda, MD 20814‐3449. ACOTE's telephone number c/o AOTA is (301) 652‐AOTA. Graduates of the program will be eligible to sit for the national certification examination for the occupational therapy assistant administered by the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT). After successful completion of this exam, the individual will be a Certified Occupational Therapy Assistant (COTA). In addition, most states require licensure in order to practice; however, state licenses are usually based on the results of the NBCOT Certification Examination. Note that a felony conviction may affect a graduate's ability to sit for the NBCOT certification examination or attain state licensure.

The Occupational Therapy Assistant program publishes a student handbook that outlines specific program policies that are not explained in the general catalog. The specific policies as described in the handbook take precedence over any general policy outlined in the college catalog. A copy of the handbook is available for review in the OTA program director's office. An acceptable health physical and verification of immunization are required. Some fieldwork sites may require an acceptable Bureau of Criminal Identification and Investigation (BCI&I) report and drug screening. The Associate of Applied Science is awarded upon completion of this program.

Program Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the program, graduates will:

  1. Have acquired an educational foundation in liberal arts and science, including a focus on issues related to diversity.
  2. Be educated as a generalist with a broad exposure to the delivery models and systems used in settings where occupational therapy is currently practiced and where it is emerging as a service.
  3. Have achieved entry‐level competence through a combination of academic and fieldwork education.
  4. Be prepared to articulate and apply occupational therapy principles and intervention tools to achieve expected outcomes as related to occupation.
  5. Be prepared to articulate and apply therapeutic use of occupations with individuals or groups for the purpose of participation in roles and situations in home, school, workplace, community, and other settings.
  6. Be able to apply occupational therapy interventions to address the physical, cognitive, psychosocial, sensory, and other aspects of performance in a variety of contexts and environments to support engagement in everyday life activities that affect health, well‐being and quality of life.
  7. Be prepared to be a lifelong learner and keep current with best practice.
  8. Demonstrate an understanding and abide by the code of ethics established for state licensure and those established by the American Occupational Therapy Association during academic and fieldwork education.
  9. Understand the distinct roles and responsibilities of the occupational therapist and occupational therapy assistant in the supervisory process.
  10. Be prepared to effectively communicate and work inter-professionally with those who provide care for individuals and/or populations in order to clarify each member's responsibility in executing components of an intervention plan.
  11. Be prepared to advocate as a professional for the occupational therapy services offered and for the recipients of those services

Where You Could Go

Occupational Therapy Assistants can be found working in medical facilities such as hospitals, rehabilitation centers, nursing homes and outpatient centers. They can also be found working in schools, pediatric facilities, private practices, mental health or community agencies, group homes, or in industries.

Transfer Pathways

NC State maintains formal transfer agreements with four-year colleges and universities throughout the state of Ohio. These should help you make a smooth transition toward your bachelor’s degree, or beyond. In addition, opportunities may be available to pursue further education in specific areas of study while working in the field.

Enrollment

The Occupational Therapy Assistant program is part of the Health Sciences Division with limited yearly enrollment. Applications must be completed by January of each year for admission to the program for the following fall term.

Contact the office of Health Sciences Division to find out about an information session with an OTA faculty member to learn about the admission process.

Program Progression

After acceptance into the program, students begin an five term sequence of course work including general foundational coursework and Occupational Therapy technical coursework leading to an associate degree in applied science. Students may take the non-OTA course work prior to acceptance into the OTA program.

Fieldwork Experiences

Each student will have the opportunity to integrate academic skills with actual hands on experiences throughout the 2 year program ending with two, 8 week full time fieldwork rotations. Students must successfully complete Level II fieldwork within the specified deadline dates within the college calendar for the associated fieldwork courses. All academic and fieldwork requirements must be completed before the student will be eligible to sit for the National Certification Examination.

Program Outcomes

The total number of graduates from North Central State College, Occupational Therapy Assistant (OTA) program during the 4-year period of 2014-2017 was 73, with an overall graduation rate of 72%. The overall average NBCOT pass rate is 97% (w/o 2017 data).

Graduation Year: 2014
Students Entering / Graduating: 16 / 9
Graduation Rate: 56%
NBCOT Pass Rate: 100%
Graduation Year: 2015
Students Entering / Graduating: 19 / 15
Graduation Rate: 79%
NBCOT Pass Rate: 100%
Graduation Year: 2016
Students Entering / Graduating: 18 / 14
Graduation Rate: 78%
NBCOT Pass Rate: 93%
Graduation Year: 2017
Students Entering / Graduating: 20 / 15
Graduation Rate: 75%
NBCOT Pass Rate: 87%
Graduation Year: 2018
Students Entering / Graduating: 20 / 16
Graduation Rate: 80%
NBCOT Pass Rate: 88%
Graduation Year: Total
Students Entering / Graduating: 93 / 69
Graduation Rate: 74%*
NBCOT Pass Rate: 94%**
*Graduation Rate: The total number of students who graduated from a program within 150% of the published length of the program, divided by the number of students on the roster who started in the program.

**NBCOT Pass Rate: For graduates attempting the national certification exam within 12 months of graduation from the program regardless of the number of attempts. OTA program results from the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT) can be found online at https://secure.nbcot.org/data/schoolstats.aspx, opens in a new window

Year One

Fall Semester

BIOL 2751 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I

This course is an in-depth study of the principles of human anatomy and physiology. It includes the study of structure and function of the body as a whole and study of cell biology, histology, the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, endocrine, and nervous systems plus the special senses. Laboratory exercises are designed to supplement lecture topics and include microscopy, the study of models, cat and specimen dissection, cadaver study, and physiological experiments. (OTM approved course in Natural Sciences TMNS)

Credit Hours: 4
Lecture Hours: 3
Required Prerequisite Course: High school chemistry with minimum C minus (C-) grade or CHEM 1010 with minimum C minus (C-) grade; AND ENGL 0040, MATH 0084 (Minimum grade of C- for all); OR qualifying placement test score. If the student has completed BIO121 and BIO122 OR BIOL 1730 with a minimum grade of C, then the student is not required to have high school Chemistry or
Required Concurrent Course: Take BIOL 2751L

ENGL 1010 - English Composition I

This is a basic course in expository writing and critical reading. Students read a variety of nonfiction works and write summaries, analysis, essays, and a researched argument in response to their reading. Students learn to read actively and accurately and to organize, develop, and revise coherent papers appropriate for a college-educated audience. (OTM for First Writing Course TME001)

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Required Prerequisite Course: ENGL 0040; (minimum grade of C-), or qualifying placement test scores

OTAP 1015 - Introduction to OTA

This course will examine the profession of occupational therapy and its role in educational systems, health care and the community. Topics include the history of the profession, the development and utilization of occupational therapy assistants, philosophical principles of the profession, the Occupational Therapy Framework: Domain and Process, Standards of Practice, Code of Ethics, roles of the occupational therapist and occupational therapy assistant, and national and state credentialing requirements. Students will be exposed to the relevant theories prevalent within the occupational Therapy profession. There will also be discussion about professional relationships, along with exploration of cultural, ethical and legal issues in occupational therapy practice.  Relationship to Curriculum Design:  This course addresses the Occupational Performance, Client-Centered Practice,   Health, Wellness and Quality of Life, Communication Skills, and Professional and Ethical Behavior threads of the curriculum design.

Credit Hours: 1
Lecture Hours: 1
Required Concurrent Course: Take OTAP 1020, OTAP 1021;

OTAP 1020 - Foundations I: Activity Analysis

The student will be introduced to the analysis and performance of occupations in work, self-care, play and leisure throughout the life span, including adaptation to achieve a therapeutic goal. This course will focus on the development of observation skills, assessment and teaching, adapting, and grading occupations. The proper care, storage, and maintenance of equipment and supplies will also be discussed. Relationship to Curriculum Design: This course addresses the Occupational Performance and Professional and Ethical Behavior threads of the curriculum design.

Credit Hours: 2
Lecture Hours: 1
Required Concurrent Course: Take OTAP 1015, OTAP 1021 and OTAP 1020L

OTAP 1021 - Foundations Ii: Therapeutic Relationships

This course provides an overview of the origins of psychiatric occupational therapy and the theoretical foundation of mental health practice. How the occupational therapy process is applied within the context of mental health practice is discussed. In addition, interpersonal relationships, therapeutic use of self and group roles and development are discussed. Students continue to build observation skills, interaction skills and practice leading and working within groups. Relationship to Curriculum Design: This course addresses the Occupational Performance, Client-Centered Practice, Health, Wellness and Quality of Life, Communication Skills, Clinical Reasoning, and Professional and Ethical Behavior threads of the curriculum design.

Credit Hours: 2
Lecture Hours: 1
Required Concurrent Course: Take OTAP 1015, OTAP 1020 and OTAP 1021L

PSYC 1010 - Introduction to Psychology

Introduction to Psychology is an introductory level course and is a study of the basic human behavior. Topics include the history of psychology, scientific methods, biological processes, cognitive processes, sensation and perception, consciousness, learning, intelligence, human development, personality theory, psychopathology and treatment, stress and health, and social psychology. Please note outcomes are written to OBR standards using OBR language. Ohio Articulation Number OSS015. This course meets the requirements for OTM in Social and Behavioral Science TMSBS

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

Spring Semester

BIOL 2752 - Anatomy and Physiology II

This course is a continuation of BIOL 2751. It includes the study of structure and function of blood and the cardiovascular, lymphatic/immunity, digestive, respiratory, urinary, and reproductive systems. Laboratory exercises are designed to supplement lecture topics and include microscopy, the study of models, cat and specimen dissection, cadaver study, and physiological experiments. (OTM approved course in Natural Sciences TMNS)

Credit Hours: 4
Lecture Hours: 3
Required Prerequisite Course: Take BIOL 2751; Minimum Grade C-
Required Concurrent Course: Take BIOL 2752L

OTAP 1022 - OTA Kinesiology

Kinesiology incorporates the study of many areas including anatomy, physiology, physics and biomechanics. Students will learn about qualitative and quantitative methods to gather information about client's movements. Students are introduced to range of motion and manual muscle testing and learn to apply them within activity analysis. They will work on developing a greater understanding of how to use this information to develop effective interventions to effect change within their clients. Relationship to Curriculum Design: This course addresses the Occupational Performance, Clinical Reasoning, Professional, and Ethical Behavior threads of the curriculum design.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 2
Required Prerequisite Course: Take BIOL 2751, OTAP 1015, OTAP 1020, OTAP 1021;
Required Concurrent Course: Take OTAP 1022L

OTAP 1030 - Process I: Developmental

A review of human development from birth to adolescence in relation to occupational performance will be provided. Issues that may impact occupational performance and thus require adaptation will be discussed. Topics will include theory, evidence based practice, frames of reference, the occupational therapy process and the roles of OTA and OT in practice settings for this population will be discussed. Relationship to Curriculum Design: This course addresses the Occupational Performance, Client-Centered Practice, Health, Wellness and Quality of Life, Clinical Reasoning, and Professional and Ethical Behavior threads of the curriculum design.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 2
Clinical Hours: 8
Required Prerequisite Course: Take BIOL 2751, OTAP 1020 OTAP 1021;
Required Concurrent Course: Take OTAP 1031 and OTAP 1030L

OTAP 1031 - Practice I: Developmental

This course provides observation and experience opportunities for individuals to learn more about the client population (children to adolescents) and to begin to develop professional insights. The course provides lecture and discussion to complement topics and experiences in directed practice (fieldwork level I) sites. Directed practice (fieldwork level I) hours may be supervised by clinical educators or faculty at approved health care, educational or community setting. Students are responsible for transportation. Relationship to Curriculum Design: This course addresses the Occupational Performance, Communication Skills, Clinical Reasoning, Professional

Credit Hours: 2
Lecture Hours: 1
Practicum Hours: 5
Required Concurrent Course: Take OTAP 1030

PSYC 2010 - Human Growth and Development

This course presents an overview of the total life span of human growth and development from conception through old age. It begins with a study of the major theories of human development and includes an examination of the dynamics of human growth in five areas: physical, intellectual, personality, social and moral. The developmental tasks and behavioral characteristics of eight stages of human growth are examined, ending with a brief treatment of death and dying. Please note outcomes are written to OBR standards using OBR language. Ohio Articulation Number OSS048. This course meets the requirements for OTM in Social and Behavioral Science TMSBS

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Required Prerequisite Course: Take PSYC 1010

Summer Semester

HLTH 1150 - Medical Terminology

This course will introduce medical terminology; including common medical root words, prefixes, suffixes, and combining forms. It will include common medical abbreviations, pronunciation, spelling, and definitions of medical terminology related to the human body systems. Students who are pursuing an allied health or nursing degree, or working in health care professions will enhance their knowledge of medical terminology in this course. (TAG# OHL020 and CTAG# CTMT001)

Credit Hours: 2
Lecture Hours: 2

OTAP 2040 - Process II Adult Physical Dysfunction

A review of human development from adolescence to adulthood in relation to occupational performance will be provided. The impact of traumatic injury and illnesses on occupational performance will be explored. Issues that may impact occupational performance and thus require adaptation will be discussed. Topics will include theory, evidence based practice, frames of reference, the occupational therapy process and the roles of OTA and OT in practice settings for this population will be discussed. Relationship to Curriculum Design: This course addresses the Occupational Performance, Client-Centered Practice, Health, Wellness and Quality of Life, Clinical Reasoning, and Professional and Ethical Behavior threads of the curriculum design.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 2
Required Prerequisite Course: Take BIOL 2752, OTAP 1030;
Required Concurrent Course: Take OTAP 2041 and OTAP 2040L

OTAP 2041 - Practice II Adult Physical Dysfunction

This course provides observation and experience opportunities for individuals to learn more about the client population (adolescence to adulthood) and to begin to develop professional insights. The course provides lecture and discussion to complement topics and experiences in directed practice (Level I fieldwork) sites. Directed practice (Level I fieldwork) hours may be supervised by clinical educators or faculty at approved health care, educational or community setting. Students are responsible for transportation. Relationship to Curriculum Design: This course addresses the Occupational Performance, Communication Skills, Clinical Reasoning, Professional and Ethical Behavior threads of the curriculum design.

Credit Hours: 2
Lecture Hours: 1
Practicum Hours: 5

PSYC 2050 - Abnormal Psychology

This course will examine the definition, classification, origin, and treatment of abnormal behavior. Categories of disorders discussed will include personality, anxiety, mood, somatoform, dissociative, sexual, psychotic, developmental- related and addictive disorders. Research methodology in abnormal psychology, historical perspective, the assessment process, ethical issues and use of the DSM will also be emphasized. Please note outcomes are written to OBR standards using OBR language. Ohio Articulation Number OSS017. This course meets the requirements for OTM in Social and Behavioral Science TMSBS

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3
Required Prerequisite Course: Take PSYC 1010;

STAT 1010 - Probability and Statistics

This course provides the student with an overview of probability and statistics. Probability terminology, concepts and rules are emphasized in solving probability problems. Descriptive statistics, including measures of central tendency and dispersion, charts, tables and diagrams are used to summarize data. The student is introduced to the binomial, Poisson, hyper-geometric, normal and t-distributions. Confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation, and linear regression are used to make conclusions concerning population parameters from sample data. This course meets the requirements for OTM Introductory Statistics TMM010.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

Year Two

Fall Semester

COMM 1010 - Speech

This course involves instruction and experience in giving a presentation. Students are taught the principles of speech content and delivery so that they can effectively participate in a variety of practical speaking situations. Presentations will include the informative speech, persuasive speech, visual aid/demonstration speech, impromptu speech, and group presentation. (OTM for Oral Communication TMCOM and TAG# OCM013)

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

OTAP 2050 - Process III: Community and Aging

A review of human development from adulthood to geriatrics in relation to occupational performance will be provided. The impact of aging on occupational performance with an emphasis on aging in society will be explored. Issues that may impact occupational performance and thus require adaptation will be discussed. Topics will include theory, evidence based practice, frames of reference, the occupational therapy process and the roles of OTA and OT in practice settings for this population will be discussed. Relationship to Curriculum Design: This course addresses the Occupational Performance, Client-Centered Practice, Health, Wellness and Quality of Life, Clinical Reasoning, and Professional and Ethical Behavior threads of the curriculum design.

Credit Hours: 4
Lecture Hours: 3
Required Prerequisite Course: Take OTAP 2040;
Required Concurrent Course: Take OTAP 2050L, OTAP 2051 and OTAP 2065

OTAP 2051 - Practice III Community and Aging

This course provides observation and experiential opportunities for individuals to focus on the psychological and social factors that influence engagement in occupation within the adult and geriatric client population and to begin to develop professional insights. The course provides lecture and discussion to complement topics and experiences in directed practice (Level I fieldwork) sites. Directed practice (Level I fieldwork) hours may be supervised by clinical educators or faculty at approved health care, educational or community setting. Students are responsible for transportation. Relationship to Curriculum Design: This course addresses the Occupational Performance, Health, Wellness and Quality of Life, Communication Skills, Clinical Reasoning, and Professional and Ethical Behavior threads of the curriculum design.

Credit Hours: 2
Lecture Hours: 1
Practicum Hours: 5
Required Concurrent Course: Take OTAP 2050

OTAP 2065 - Current Practice Trends

Current practice trends in the local region and emerging theories and techniques in the field of occupational therapy will be explored. The role of occupational therapy assistants in management will be explored in addition to preparation for Professional practice. Relationship to Curriculum Design: This course addresses the Occupational Performance, Client-Centered Practice, Health, Wellness and Quality of Life, Communication Skills and Professional and Ethical Behavior threads of the curriculum design.

Credit Hours: 2
Lecture Hours: 2
Required Prerequisite Course: Take OTAP 2040, OTAP 2041;
Required Concurrent Course: Take OTAP 2050, OTAP 2051;

PHIL 1110 - Ethics

This course involves an examination of several ethical theories, including ethical relativism, utilitarianism, virtue ethics, social contract ethics, theological ethics, and rational ethics. Subjects covered may include the ethics of nuclear war, the ethics of suicide, ethical issues in abortion, the ethics of euthanasia, ethical issues in genetic engineering, sexual ethics, racism and sexism, capital punishment, ethics and the environment and so on. This course meets the requirements for OTM Arts and Humanities TMAH and slso TAG# OAH046.

Credit Hours: 3
Lecture Hours: 3

Spring Semester

OTAP 2080 - Directed Practice:FWIIA

Having completed three varied directed practice (Fieldwork I experiences), the student will be prepared to enter directed practice (Fieldwork Level II), a 35 hr/week experience. Students will function as staff members of cooperating facilities and use the occupational therapy process while practicing as an entry level OTA. Students are expected to comply with agency policies and to conduct themselves in a professional manner. Students may be assigned to work with individuals with developmental, physical or emotional challenges. Students are responsible for transportation, room and board. This course is graded Pass (P) or No Pass (NP).

Credit Hours: 3
Practicum Hours: 18
Required Prerequisite Course: Take OTAP 2050, OTAP 2051, OTAP 2065;
Required Concurrent Course: Take OTAP 2081, OTAP 2085;

OTAP 2081 - Directed Practice: FWIIB

Having completed OTAP 2080 - Directed Practice:FWIIA, the student is prepared to complete the second directed practice (Fieldwork Level II), a 35 hr/week experience. Students will function as staff members of cooperating facilities and use the occupational therapy process while practicing as an entry level OTA. Students are expected to comply with agency policies and to conduct themselves in a professional manner. Students may be assigned to work with individuals with developmental, physical or emotional challenges. Students are responsible for transportation, room and board. This course is graded Pass (P) or No Pass (NP).

Credit Hours: 3
Practicum Hours: 18
Required Prerequisite Course: Take OTAP 2050, OTAP 2051, OTAP 2065;
Required Concurrent Course: Take OTAP 2080, OTAP 2085;

OTAP 2085 - Seminar: FWII

This seminar course is designed to provide directed practice students with online support through their experiences. Students will also attend either evening or weekend "workshop seminars" arranged by the coordinating faculty to support professional development through this experience and to help prepare the student for the NBCOT examination and professional practice. This course is graded Pass (P) or No Pass (NP). Relationship to Curriculum Design: This course addresses Communication Skills, Clinical Reasoning, and Professional and Ethical Behavior threads of the curriculum design.

Credit Hours: 1
Seminar Hours: 1
Required Prerequisite Course: Take OTAP 2050, OTAP 2051, OTAP 2065;
Required Concurrent Course: Take OTAP 2080, OTAP 2081;

Total Credit Hours: 64